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Annotated Checklist of
Recorders Made Before 1800


NMM 4142. Treble (alto) recorder by Johann Benedikt Gahn, 
Imperial City of Nürnberg, before 1711

NMM 4142. Treble (alto) recorder by Johann Benedikt Gahn, Imperial City of Nürnberg, before 1711.  Boxwood, ornately carved.  The headjoint is carved in the shape of an anthropomorphic fish head with human eyes which seem to stare up at the player with a watchful expression.  Rawlins Fund, 1987.



Checklist Index

Descant (Soprano) Recorders
Treble (Alto) Recorders
Tenor Recorders
Bass Recorders

Makers

Aardenberg, Abraham van
Bressan, Peter J.
Denner, Jacob: 1715 (treble), 1715 (tenor)
Denner, Johann Christoph
Denner, Johann David or Jacob
Gahn, Johann Benedikt
Haka, Richard
Hallett, Benjamin
Heerde, Jan Juriaensz van
Master "S"
Rottenburgh, Jean-Hyacinth-Joseph
Schnitzer, Arzazius or Hans
Steenbergen, Jan
Troup, W. G.


Descant (Soprano) Recorders
(in chronological order)

NMM 4202. Descant (soprano) recorder by Richard Haka, Amsterdam, ca. 1680. Stamped on both joints, R. HAKA within a scroll, with a lily below. Two sections, ebony with ivory beak and trim. Thumbhole and eight fingerholes (duplicate holes for the little finger). Length, 34.3 cm. Original, fitted, tooled (brown and gilt) leather-covered case. Arne B. & Jeanne F. Larson Fund, 1988.

Lit.:  André P. Larson, The National Music Museum: A Pictorial Souvenir (Vermillion: National Music Museum, 1988), p. 39.

Wendy Powers, "Checklist of Historic Recorders in American Private and Public Collections," The American Recorder, Vol. XXX, No. 2 (May 1989), pp. 61-62.

Jan Bouterse, "Historical Dutch Recorders in American Collections," American Recorder, Vol. 33, No. 3 (September 1992), pp. 15-16.




NMM 4826. Descant (soprano) recorder in B-flat (fourth flute) by Master "S," Imperial City of Nürnberg, ca. 1730. Inscribed S on all three joints. Three sections, stained boxwood with ivory mount, thumbhole and six fingerholes on the main joint, one fingerhole on the foot joint. Length, 34.9 cm. Ex colls.: Archibald Nettlefold, Kent, England, and Philip Bate, London. Higbee-Abbott-Zylstra Collection, 1989.

Lit.: Wendy Powers, "Checklist of Historic Recorders in American Private and Public Collections," The American Recorder, Vol. XXX, No. 2 (May 1989), p. 60.




NMM 4825. Descant (soprano) recorder in c'' (fifth flute) by Benjamin Hallett, London, before 1760. Stamped on all three joints, HALLETT, with a 4 above. Three sections, stained boxwood, thumbhole and six fingerholes on the main joint, one fingerhole on the foot joint. Length, 36.8 cm. Ex coll.: Fritz Spiegl, Liverpool, England. Higbee-Abbott-Zylstra Collection, 1989.

Lit.: Wendy Powers, "Checklist of Historic Recorders in American Private and Public Collections," The American Recorder, Vol. XXX, No. 2 (May 1989), p. 60.

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Treble (Alto) Recorders
(in chronological order)

  NMM 4504. Treble (alto) recorder in F by Jan Juriaensz van Heerde, Amsterdam, ca. 1670. Stamped just below the window, I.V.H. in a scroll. One-piece, Indian ivory body, thumbhole and eight fingerholes (the duplicate hole for the left little finger is plugged). Length, 46.5 cm. Rawlins Fund, 1987.

Lit.: "1987 Acquisitions at USD Music Museum," American Musical Instrument Society Newsletter Vol. 17, No. 2 (June 1988), p. 2.

Wendy Powers, "Checklist of Historic Recorders in American Private and Public Collections," The American Recorder, Vol. 30, No. 2 (May 1989), p. 62.

Jan Bouterse, "Historical Dutch Recorders in American Collections," American Recorder, Vol. 33, No. 3 (September 1992), pp. 14-15.

Technical drawing available from Gift Shop.



NMM 4142. Treble (alto) recorder in F by Johann Benedikt Gahn, Imperial City of Nürnberg, before 1711. Stamped at the top of the main joint, I. B. GAHN in a scroll with monogram below, all of it now nearly illegible. Three sections, boxwood, ornately carved, the headjoint as an anthropomorphic fish head with human eyes, foliate patterns, the foot joint also with foliate patterns, thumbhole and six fingerholes on the main joint, one fingerhole on the foot joint. Length, 50 cm. Rawlins Fund, 1987.

Lit.: "1987 Acquisitions at USD Music Museum," Newsletter of the American Musical Instrument Society, Vol. XVII, No. 2 (June 1988), p. 2.

André P. Larson, The National Music Museum: A Pictorial Souvenir (Vermillion: National Music Museum, 1988), p. 36.

Wendy Powers, "Checklist of Historic Recorders in American Private and Public Collections," The American Recorder, Vol. XXX, No. 2 (May 1989), p. 62.




NMM 3978. Treble (alto) recorder in F by Abraham van Aardenberg, Amsterdam, 1698-1717. Stamped on all three joints, AARDENBERG within a scroll, with three fleurs-de-lis below and an animal above (Langwill believes these to be deer rampant--an Aardenberg oboe [NMM 4074] in the Museum's collections has a running deer above the name--however, it is not a deer on this recorder, but perhaps the profile of a bird standing upright). Three sections, stained boxwood, thumbhole and six fingerholes on the main joint, one fingerhole on the foot joint. Length, 50.4 cm. Board of Trustees, 1986.

Lit.: Wendy Powers, "Checklist of Historic Recorders in American Private and Public Collections," The American Recorder, Vol. XX X, No. 2 (May 1989), p. 62.

Jan Bouterse, "Historical Dutch Recorders in American Collections," American Recorder, Vol. 33, No. 3 (September 1992), pp. 58, 62.




NMM 6043. Treble (alto) recorder by Jacob Denner, Imperial City of Nürnberg, ca. 1715. Stamped on all three sections I . DENNER (within a scroll) / I [fir tree] D. Three sections, boxwood, thumbhole and six fingerholes on the main joint, one fingerhole on the foot joint. Length, ca. 49.9 cm (some warp). Ex coll.: Albrecht Kleinschmidt, Neu Ulm, Germany. Purchase funds gift of Cindy and Tom Lillibridge, Bonesteel, South Dakota, and Linda and John Lillibridge, Burke, South Dakota, 1997.

Lit.: André P. Larson, "From the Time of Bach and Handel...Museum Adds Rare Recorders from 18th-Century Nürnberg," America's Shrine to Music Museum Newsletter, Vol. XXIV, No. 4 (August 1997), pp. 1-2.

-------, "Alto & Tenor Recorders by Jacob Denner, Imperial City of Nürnberg, ca. 1715," The South Dakota Musician, Vol. 32, No.2 (Winter 1998), cover and p. 20.

David Schulenberg, Music of the Baroque (Oxford: Oxford University Press, 2001), p. 264.




NMM 6172. Treble (alto) recorder by Jan Steenbergen, Amsterdam, ca. 1720. Stamped on all joints, I : STEENBERGEN. Three sections, ivory, thumbhole and six fingerholes on main joint, one fingerhole on the foot joint (fingerholes 6 and 7 are both doubled). Length, 52.8 cm. Rawlins Fund, 1998.




NMM 9826. Treble (alto) recorder in F by Johann Christoph Denner workshop (Johann David or Jacob Denner), Imperial City of Nürnberg, ca. 1720. Stamped below the window, below the third tonehole, and on the foot, I. C. Denner (within a scroll) / D / I . Three sections in ivory, thumbhole and eight fingerholes (double hole for producing f1 / f-sharp1). Length, 49.65 cm. Ex coll.: Peter Koval. Arne B. and Jeanne F. Larson Fund, 2000.

Lit.: Mary Oleskiewicz, "Unknown Denner Recorder Surfaces," America's Shrine to Music Museum Newsletter, Vol. XXVII, No. 4 (November 2000), pp. 7-8.




NMM 4564. Treble (alto) recorder by W. G. Troup, England, ca. 1775-1800. Stamped on both joints, W. G. TROUP. Originally three sections, foot joint missing, boxwood, thumbhole and six fingerholes on the main joint. Arne B. Larson Estate, 1988.

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Tenor Recorders
(in chronological order)

NMM 4879. Tenor recorder by Jean-Hyacinth-Joseph Rottenburgh, Brussels, ca. 1700-25. Stamped on all three joints, I.H. / ROTTENBURGH above a star. Three sections, stained boxwood with ivory mount, thumbhole and six fingerholes on the main joint, one brass key with swallowtail touchpiece and a round, flat cover (the spring is attached to the key). Length, 67.5 cm. Ex coll.: Laurent Kaltenbach, Paris. Arne B. and Jeanne F. Larson Fund, 1989.

Lit.: Musical Instruments, London, November 22-23, 1989 (London: Sotheby's, 1989), pp. 24-25.




NMM 6044. Tenor recorder by Jacob Denner, Imperial City of Nürnberg, ca. 1715. Stamped on all three sections, I . DENNER (within a scroll) / I [fir tree] D. Three sections, boxwood, thumbhole and six fingerholes on the main joint, one brass key, with a round, flat cover on the foot joint. SATW. Length, ca. 67.2 cm (some warp). Ex coll.: Albrecht Kleinschmidt, Neu Ulm, Germany. Purchase funds gift of Cindy and Tom Lillibridge, Bonesteel, South Dakota, and Linda and John Lillibridge, Burke, South Dakota, 1997.

Lit.: André P. Larson, "From the Time of Bach and Handel...Museum Adds Rare Recorders from 18th-Century Nürnberg," America's Shrine to Music Museum Newsletter, Vol. XXIV, No. 4 (August 1997), pp. 1-2.

-------, "Alto & Tenor Recorders by Jacob Denner, Imperial City of Nürnberg, ca. 1715," The South Dakota Musician, Vol. 32, No.2 (Winter 1998), cover and p. 20.

David Schulenberg, Music of the Baroque (Oxford: Oxford University Press, 2001), p. 264.




NMM 4827. Tenor recorder in D (voice flute) by Peter J. Bressan, London, before 1730. Stamped on all three joints, P I / BRESSAN above a cinquefoil rose. Three sections, stained boxwood, thumbhole and six fingerholes on the main joint, one fingerhole on the foot joint. The thumbhole is to the right of the center, which suggests that the instrument was made for a left-handed player. Length, 60.95 cm. Ex coll.: Fritz Spiegl, Liverpool, England. Higbee-Abbott-Zylstra Collection, 1989.

Lit.: Dale Higbee, "J. S. Bach's Sonatas for Recorder and Harpsichord after BWV 525-530," The American Recorder, Vol. XVIII, No. 4 (November 1978), pp. 112-113.

-------, "On Playing Recorders in D: Being a Short History of the Odd-Sized Recorders and Concerning the Revival of the Voice Flute and Sixth Flute," The American Recorder, Vol. XXVI, No. 1 (February 1985), pp. 16-21.

-------, "A Left-handed 'Voice Flute' by Bressan," Galpin Society Journal, Vol. XXXVIII (April 1985), p. 143.

Wendy Powers, "Checklist of Historic Recorders in American Private and Public Collections," The American Recorder, Vol. XXX, No. 2 (May 1989), pp. 60-61.

"1989 Acquisitions at USD Music Museum," Newsletter of the American Musical Instrument Society, Vol. XIX, No. 1 (February 1990), p. 14.

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Bass Recorders
(in chronological order)

NMM 3606. Bass (basset) recorder in G attributed to Arzazius or Hans Schnitzer, Munich or Imperial City of Nürnberg, ca. 1550. Stamped twice just below the window with the same maker's mark that is also found on five srayffaiff (schreyerpfeife) from Rožmberk, inventoried in 1599 and 1600, now in the Národní Muzeum in Prague. One piece, boxwood with brass trim, thumbhole and six fingerholes, one brass key with swallowtail touchpiece and a flat, round cover with the pad sewn to the cover, a heavy brass spring attached to the wood, all of this covered with a perforated wood fontanelle (sleeve). Length, 91.8 cm. Ex coll.: Canon Francis W. Galpin, Harlow, England. Arne B. & Jeanne F. Larson Fund, 1985.

The Rožmberk court band was set up in 1552 and enlarged during the following half century.

Lit.: An Illustrated Catalogue of the Music Loan Exhibition Held ... by the Worshipful Company of Musicians of Fishmongers' Hall, June and July 1904 (London: Novello, 1909), pp. 181-182.

André P. Larson, "Original bass recorders in the United States," The American Recorder, Vol. XXVI, No. 4 (November 1985), cover and pp. 171-172.

"Renaissance bass (basset) recorder," Newsletter of the American Musical Instrument Society, Vol. XV, No. 3 (October 1986), pp. 8-9.

André P. Larson, The National Music Museum: A Pictorial Souvenir (Vermillion: National Music Museum, 1988), p. 36.

Wendy Powers, "Checklist of Historic Recorders in American Private and Public Collections," The American Recorder, Vol. XXX, No. 2 (May 1989), p. 62.




NMM 3605. Bass Recorder in F by Johann Christoph Denner, Imperial City of Nürnberg, ca. 1700. Stamped on head and foot joints, I. C. DENNER within a scroll, with a D below. Three sections, with a detachable head cap encircled with a brass band, detachable bocal enters at the top, fruitwood, thumbhole and six fingerholes on the main joint, one brass key with a flat, square key cover (corners cut) and a typical, round touchpiece, for the left little finger, on the foot joint (the spring is attached to the wood). A crack in the main joint shows an early repair, with two small pieces of wood that match the wood of the body set across the crack to hold it together. Length, 103.5 cm. Ex coll.: de Bricqueville, Versailles. Board of Trustees, 1985.

Lit.: André P. Larson, "Original bass recorders in the United States," The American Recorder, Vol. XXVI, No. 4 (November 1985), cover and pp. 171-172.

André P. Larson, The National Music Museum: A Pictorial Souvenir (Vermillion: National Music Museum, 1988), p. 36.

Wendy Powers, "Checklist of Historic Recorders in American Private and Public Collections," The American Recorder, Vol. XXX, No. 2 (May 1989), p. 62.

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Return to Checklist of 16th- and 17th-Century Instruments
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