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Checklist of 16th- and 17th-century Instruments

NMM 4031. Chest Organ by Johannes Jacob Hannss, northern Germany, ca. 1620.

NMM 4031. Chest organ by Johannes Jacob Hannss, northern Germany, ca. 1620.
Marjorie T. Rawlins Collection, 1986.

Instrument Index
Maker Index

Bows

Citterns

Cornetti

Flute

Gong

Guitars

Harp

Harpsichords

Horns

Liras da Braccio

Lutes

Mandolins

Oboe

Organ

Percussion Slab

Pochettes and Kits

Recorder, Descant (Soprano)

Recorders, Treble (Alto)

Recorders, Bass

Shofar

Timpani

Trombones

Trumpets

Trumpet Marine

Veltshalmey

Viola da gamba, Treble

Viola da gamba, Tenor

Violas da gamba, Bass

Violas

Violins

Violoncelli

   

Maker Index

 

Aardenberg, Abraham van - oboe, recorder
Amati, Andrea - viola; violins: 1560, 1574; violoncello
Amati, Antonio and Girolamo
Amati, Girolamo - 1604, 1609, 1613
Amati, Nicolo
Bente, Matteo
Brescian School - violins: 1625, 1630, 1640; violoncello
Busch, Ernst
Crétien
D. G.
Denner, Johann Christoph
Dufour, Nicolas
Edlinger, Thomas
Everbroeck, Gommaar van
Gasparo da Salò - bass viol/violoncello, bass viol, viola
Grancino, Giovanni
Grinde, Honoré
Guarneri, Andrea
Guarracino, Onofrio
Haas, Johann Wilhelm - 1681, 1690
Hainlein, Paul
Haka, Richard - recorder, veltschalmey
Hannss, Johannes Jacob 
Harton, Andrea
Haward, Charles
Hoskin, John
Karpp, Gregor
Kodisch, Johann Carl
Linarol, Francesco
Linarol, Ventura di Francesco - lira da braccio/viola, bass viol
Maggini, Giovanni Paolo - viols, violin
Mariani, Lodovico
Nagel, Michael
Naust, Pierre
Oreibla, Giuseppe
Presbler, Francesco
Railich, Pieter
Rautta, Petrus
Ridolfi, Giacomo
Ruckers the Elder, Andreas - 1607, 1643
Schnitzer, Arzazius or Hans
Sellas, Domenico
Sellas, Matteo - guitar, archlute
Stainer, Jacob - tenor viola, violin
Steinmez, Georg Friedrich
Stradivari, Antonio - bow, guitar, choral mandolino, violin, violin belly
Straub, Frantz
Testore, Carlo
Tieffenbrucker, Magnus
Tieffenbrucker family
Tielke, Joachim
van Heerde, Jan Juriaensz
Vaninus, Franciscus
Venetian School - guitar, bass viol
Voboam, Alexandre
Vuillaume, Jean-Baptiste
Wörle, Mathias
Zanetto di Montichiaro
Zanetto, Peregrino di

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BOWS
(in chronological order)

NMM 3389. Violin bow, ca. 1680. Later frog in shape of a crouching lion attributed to Jean-Baptiste Vuillaume, Paris, ca. 1850. Witten-Rawlins Collection, 1984.


NMM 3470. Violin bow, ca. 1700. Witten-Rawlins Collection, 1984.


NMM 4882. Violin bow attributed to the workshop of Antonio Stradivari, Cremona, ca. 1700. Ex colls.: King Charles IV of Spain; W. E. Hill & Sons, London. Arne B. and Jeanne F. Larson Fund, 1989.

Lit.:  André P. Larson, Beethoven & Berlioz, Paris & Vienna: Musical Treasures from the Age of Revolution & Romance 1789-1848, with essay by John Koster, exhibition catalog, Washington Pavilion, Sioux Falls, South Dakota, September 12-November 2, 2003 (Vermillion: National Music Museum 2003), p. 29.


NMM 4544. Pochette bow, France, ca. 1700. Ex coll.: W. E. Hill & Sons, London. Board of Trustees, 1988.


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CITTERNS

NMM 3386. Cittern attributed to Urbino, Italy, ca. 1550. Ex coll.:  Lord Waldorf Astor, Hever Castle, Cliveden, England. Witten-Rawlins Collection, 1984.

André P. Larson, "Early Italian Plucked Stringed Instruments at the Shrine to Music Museum," Lute Society of America Newsletter, 20, No. 1 (February 1985), p. 7.

"Utah Students Visit; Restoration Admired," The Shrine to Music Museum Newsletter 13, No. 3 (April 1986), p. 4.

Margaret Downie Banks, "The Witten-Rawlins Collection and Other Early Italian Stringed Instruments at the Shrine to Music Museum," Journal of the Violin Society of America, 8, No. 3 (1987), pp. 23-24.

Joseph R. Johnson, "The Witten-Rawlins Collection of North Italian String Instruments," American Lutherie, No. 15 (1988), reprinted in The Big Red Book of American Lutherie, Volume Two: 1988-1990, Tim Olsen, editor (Tacoma, Washington: Guild of American Luthiers, 2000), pp. 100-102.

André P. Larson, The National Music Museum: A Pictorial Souvenir (Vermillion: National Music Museum, 1988), inside front cover and pp. 46-47.

Gary M. Stewart, "A Mid-Sixteenth-Century Italian Cittern at the University of South Dakota," CIMCIM Newsletter 14 (1989), pp. 31-32.

"A Treasure from the Witten-Rawlins Collection," National Music Museum Newsletter 34, No. 1 (February 2007), p. 3.


NMM 13500.  Cittern, possibly by Petrus Rautta, England, 1579. Ex coll.: Rothschild Collection, Vienna. Arne B. and Jeanne F. Larson Fund, 2007.

Lit.:  Fine Musical Instruments, Monday 2 April 2007 (New York: Christie's), Lot 34, p. 11.

Associated Press, "Stradivari Violin Goes for $2.7M," The New York Times (April 3, 2007).

Jay Kirschemann, "Rare Ancestor of Guitar Finds its Way to S. D.," Sioux Falls Argus Leader (April 5, 2007), pp. 1A & 5A.

Jennifer Muhmel, "Museum Gets Only Known English Cittern," The Volante (April 25, 2007), pp. A1 & A6.

Andrew Hartig, "Cittern, 34cm mensur, possibly English, circa 1600," Renovata Cythara: The Renaissance Cittern Site, Andrew Hartig, ed. (10 January 2008) (http://www.cittern.theaterofmusic.com/old/1600.html).

Arian Sheets, "Another 16th-century Treasure . . . A Unique Cittern From Shakespeare's England," National Music Museum Newsletter 35, No. 1 (February 2008), p. 1.

Ronald Broude, "Playing On Originals: The Material Presence of the Past," Early Music America 15, No. 4 (Winter 2009): 35.


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CORNETTI
(in chronological order)

NMM 10135. Cornetto, Italy, ca. 1550-1650. Octagonal body of wood (two halves), covered with leather, embossed decoration, upper part shaped in a diamond pattern. Original leather case. Ex colls.: Ernst Buser, Basel; Gerhard Stradner, Vienna. Joe and Joella Utley Collection, 2002.

Lit.:  Edward H. Tarr, "Ein Katalog erhaltener Zinken," Basler Jahrbuch für historische Musikpraxis, Peter Reidemeister, editor, 5 (1981), pp. 63-65.

Wilfried Seipel, ed. Für Aug' und Ohr: Musik in Kunst- und Wunderkammern. Exhibition catalog, Kunsthistorisches Museum, Schloss Ambras, 7 July-31 October 1999 (Vienna: Kunsthistorisches Museum, 1999), pp. 126-127.

Sabine Klaus, "Competing with Violins and Almost Like a Human Voice . . . Two More Cornetti Added to Museum Treasures," America's National Music Museum Newsletter 29, No. 4 (November 2002), pp. 4-5.

Bruce Haynes. A History of Performing Pitch. The Story of "A". (Lanham, Maryland, and Oxford: The Scarecrow Press, Inc., 2002), p. 427.


NMM 6200.  Cornettino, Southern Germany, ca. 1600. Octagonal body of ivory with horn mounts at each end. Six finger holes, one thumbhole. Joe and Joella Utley Collection, 1999.

Lit.:  Sabine Klaus, "Persistent 'Detective Work' Sheds New Light on Two Precious Ivory Cornetti in the Utley Collection," America's Shrine to Music Museum Newsletter 28, No. 1 (February 2001), pp. 4-5.

Sabine Klaus, "Zwei Elfenbein-Zinken aus Süddeutschland?" Zur Geschichte von Cornetto und Clarine. Symposium im Rahmen der 25. Tage Alter Musik in Herne 2000, Christian Ahrens and Gregor Klinke, eds. (Munich and Salzburg: Musikverlag Katzbichler, 2001), pp. 35-50.

Mary Oleskiewicz, "The Rise of Italian Chamber Music," Chapter Three in The World of Baroque Music:  New Perspectives, edited by George B. Stauffer (Bloomington: Indiana University Press, 2006), p. 50 and plate 9.

Ted Muenster, "South Dakota's Shrine to Music," Prairie Fire 3, No. 4 (April 2009): 14.


NMM 7368. Cornetto, Southern Germany, ca. 1600. Octagonal body of ivory, upper part shaped in a diamond pattern. Engraved with foliate designs darkened with black pigment. Ex coll.: Barons von Rothschild, Vienna. Joe and Joella Utley Collection, 1999.

Lit.:  "Recent Acquisitions," America's Shrine to Music Museum Newsletter 26, No. 4 (November 1999), p. 6.

Sabine Klaus, "Persistent 'Detective Work' Sheds New Light on Two Precious Ivory Cornetti in the Utley Collection," America's Shrine to Music Museum Newsletter 28, No. 1 (February 2001), pp. 4-5.

David Schulenberg, Music of the Baroque (Oxford: Oxford University Press, 2001), p. 136.

Sabine Klaus, "Zwei Elfenbein-Zinken aus Süddeutschland?" Zur Geschichte von Cornetto und Clarine. Symposium im Rahmen der 25. Tage Alter Musik in Herne 2000,Christian Ahrens and Gregor Klinke, eds. (Munich and Salzburg: Musikverlag Katzbichler, 2001), pp. 35-50.

Mary Oleskiewicz, "The Rise of Italian Chamber Music," Chapter Three in The World of Baroque Music:  New Perspectives, edited by George B. Stauffer (Bloomington: Indiana University Press, 2006), p. 50 and plate 9.

Ted Muenster, "South Dakota's Shrine to Music," Prairie Fire 3, No. 4 (April 2009): 14.


NMM 3451.  Tenor cornetto, Germany, ca. 1650. Octagonal body of wood covered with leather. Six finger holes, one thumbhole. One silver, open-standing fishtail key and cover. Silver ferrule. Ex coll.: Canon Francis W. Galpin, Harlow, England. Board of Trustees, 1984.

Lit.:  An Illustrated Catalogue of the Music Loan Exhibition Held . . . by the Worshipful Company of Musicians of Fishmongers' Hall, June and July 1904 (London: Novello, 1909), pp. 181 and 201.

Tony Bingham, Catalogue No. 10, Old Brasswind Instruments (London: Tony Bingham, 1983), p. 1.

"1984 Acquisitions at USD Music Museum," Newsletter of the American Musical Instrument Society 14, No. 1 (February 1985), p. 4.

Margaret Downie Banks, "17th-and 18th-Century Brass Instruments at The Shrine to Music Museum," Brass Bulletin 58, No. 2 (1987), pp. 50-51, 54, and 56.

André P. Larson, The National Music Museum: A Pictorial Souvenir (Vermillion: National Music Museum, 1988), p. 35.


NMM 10136. Treble cornetto, France or Germany, 17th or 18th century. Wood, one-piece, with brass ferrule at the mouthpiece receiver. Ex coll.: Gerhard Stradner, Vienna. Joe and Joella Utley Collection, 2002.

Lit.:  Die Klangwelt Mozarts. Exhibition catalog, Kunsthistorisches Museum, Sammlung alter Musikinstrumente, 28 April-27 October 1991 (Vienna: Kunsthistorisches Museum, 1991), p. 295, no. 193.

Sabine Klaus, "Competing with Violins and Almost Like a Human Voice . . . Two More Cornetti Added to Museum Treasures," America's National Music Museum Newsletter 29, No. 4 (November 2002), pp. 4-5.


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FLUTE

NMM 10113. Flute by Pierre Naust, Paris, ca. 1690. Three sections. Stamped on all sections: NAUST / [lion rampant]. Boxwood, large turned ivory mounts. One closed, silver key. Total length, 666 mm. Sounding length, 583 mm. Ex coll.: Friedrich von Huene, Brookline, Massachusetts. Purchase funds gift of John R. and Janice Waltner, Freeman, South Dakota, in honor of their daughters, Mary Law and Ann O'Donnell, 2002.

Lit.:  Peter Spohr, Kunsthandwerk im Dienste der Musik: Querflöten aus aller Welt im Wandel der Zeit. Exhibition catalog, Historisches Museum, Frankfurt, March 16-April 7, 1991 and Stadtmuseum, München, April 14-May 5, 1991 (Frankfurt am Main: Kurt Reichmann, 1991), p. 13 (A4).

Phillip T. Young, 4900 Historical Woodwind Instruments (London: Tony Bingham, 1993), p. 168 (Y7).

André P. Larson, "Rare Baroque Instrument is the Oldest Flute in the Museum," America's National Music Museum Newsletter 29, No. 3 (August 2002), pp. 1-2.

Harrison Powley, "Die Zauberflöte:  What's in a Title?" BYU Studies 43, No. 3 (2004), p. 19.


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GONG

NMM 2683. Ka si (kettle gong), Siam or Burma, ca. 1630-1680. Cast-bronze gong with integral handle. Instruments like the ka si (literally, "frog drum") are often associated with the magico-religious practice of summoning rain. Frog drums are highly valued among the mountain-dwelling people groups living along the border separating present-day Thailand and Myanmar. The procession of cast-bronze animals on the side of the barrel is missing an elephant, which may have been cut off and buried with the gong’s original owner. Attributed to the Ayudhya period in Siam (1350-1767), based on the shape of the resonating cavity and the adornment. Rawlins Fund, 1980.

Lit.:  Thomas E. Cross, Instruments of Burma, India, Nepal, Thailand and Tibet, The Shrine to Music Museum Catalog of the Collections, Vol. II, André P. Larson, editor (Vermillion: The Shrine to Music Museum, 1982), p. 20.

Thomas E. Cross, Instruments of Burma, India, Nepal, Thailand and Tibet, M.M. Thesis, University of South Dakota, May 1983, p. 41, plates XVI and XVII.

André P. Larson, The National Music Museum: A Pictorial Souvenir (Vermillion: National Music Museum, 1988), p. 29.


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GUITARS
(in chronological order)

NMM 3385. Guitar attributed to Matteo Sellas, Venice, ca. 1640. Ex coll.: Bisiach, Milan. Witten-Rawlins Collection, 1984.

Lit.:  André P. Larson, "Early Italian Plucked Stringed Instruments at the Shrine to Music Museum," Lute Society of America Newsletter 20, No. 1 (February 1985), p. 8.

André P. Larson, The National Music Museum: A Pictorial Souvenir (Vermillion: National Music Museum, 1988), cover, p. 40, and inside front cover.

ClassicNotes: KDFC 102.1 FM (San Francisco) 11, No. 3, Issue #7 (Spring 1996), cover.


NMM 3438. Guitar, Venetian School, ca. 1650. Ex coll.: William Lerner, New York. Witten-Rawlins Collection, 1984.


NMM 3346.  Guitar by Domenico Sellas, Venice, ca. 1670. Arne B. & Jeanne F. Larson Fund, 1984.

Lit.:  "Rare, Beautiful Guitar Evokes the Splendor That Was 17th-Century Venice," Shrine to Music Museum, Inc., Newsletter 12, No. 1 (October 1984), p. 3.

André P. Larson, "Early Italian Plucked Stringed Instruments at the Shrine to Music Museum," Lute Society of America Newsletter 20, No. 1 (February 1985), p. 9.

Margaret Downie Banks, "The Witten-Rawlins Collection and Other Early Italian Stringed Instruments at The Shrine to Music Museum," Journal of the Violin Society of America 8, No. 3 (1987), pp. 23, 25, 26.

André P. Larson, The National Music Museum: A Pictorial Souvenir (Vermillion: National Music Museum, 1988), p. 51 and inside cover.

Joseph R. Johnson, "The Witten-Rawlins Collection of North Italian String Instruments," American Lutherie 15 (1988), reprinted in The Big Red Book of American Lutherie, Vol. 2 (1988-1990), edited by Tim Olsen (Tacoma, Washington: Guild of American Luthiers, 2000-2004), pp. 100-102.


NMM 4143.  Guitar by Alexandre Voboam, Paris, 1670. Rawlins Fund, 1987.

Lit.:  "A 17th-Century Guitar from Louis XIV's Paris," Shrine to Music Museum Newsletter 15, No. 3 (April 1988), p. 2.

"1987 Acquisitions at USD Music Museum," Newsletter of the American Musical Instrument Society 17, No. 2 (June 1988), p. 2.

André P. Larson, The National Music Museum: A Pictorial Souvenir (Vermillion: National Music Museum, 1988), p. 51.

Florence Gétreau, "Recent Research about the Voboam Family and Their Guitars," Journal of the American Musical Instrument Society, 31 (2005), pp. 28, 34-39.


NMM 10076.  Guitar, Spain, ca. 1680-1720. Purchase funds gift of Margaret Ann Everist, Sioux City, Iowa, 2002.


NMM 3976.  Guitar, The Rawlins, by Antonio Stradivari, Cremona, 1700. Ex coll.: Louis Krasner, Boston. Rawlins Fund, 1985. Technical drawing available.

Lit.:  Rembert Wurlitzer, Inc., Loan Exhibition of Stringed Instruments and Bows:  Commemorating the Seventieth Birthday of Simone Fernando Sacconi, New York City, October 1966 (Stuttgart: Schuler Verlagsgesellschaft, 1966).

Herbert Goodkind, The Violin Iconography of Antonio Stradivari (Larchmont, New York: Herbert Goodkind, 1972), p. 298.

Simone Fernando Sacconi, The Secrets of Stradivari (Cremona:  Libreria Del Convegno, 1979), p. 230.

Guitares: Chefs-d'oeuvre des collections de France (Paris: La Flûte de Pan, 1980), pp. 78-82.

"Rare Strad Guitar a Highlight . . .  Important Acquisitions of 1985 Await New Galleries," Shrine to Music Museum, Inc. Newsletter 13, No. 2 (January 1986), pp. 1-2.

"1985 Acquisitions at USD Music Museum," Newsletter of the American Musical Instrument Society 15, No. 1 (February 1986), p. 8

The Strad (April 1986), front cover.

Bein & Fushi, Inc. 1987 Calendar, January/February.

Charles Beare, Capolavori di Antonio Stradivari (Milan : A. Mondadori Editore, 1987), pp. 64-65.

Margaret Downie Banks, "The Witten-Rawlins Collection and Other Early Italian Stringed Instruments at The Shrine to Music Museum," Journal of the Violin Society of America 8, No. 3 (1987), pp. 25-26.

Von Holger Skor, "Das 'Genie' Stradivari - ein Mythos? Zum 250. Todestag des legendären Instrumentenbauers," Musikblatt 14, No. 119 (December 1987-January 1988), pp. 15-17.

André P. Larson, The National Music Museum: A Pictorial Souvenir (Vermillion: National Music Museum, 1988), p. 50.

Charles Beare, with the collaboration of Bruce Carlson, Antonio Stradivari: The Cremona Exhibition of 1987 (London: J. & A. Beare, 1993), 132-136.

Gary Baese, "Reproducing the Finish of The 'Rawlins' Stradivari Guitar," American Lutherie 33 (Spring 1993), pp. 30-34.

"Country Almanac: Legendary Sounds," Country America (June 1993), p. 16.

Darcy Kuronen, Dangerous Curves: The Art of the Guitar (Boston: Museum of Fine Arts, 2001), pp. 32 and 220.

David Massey, "From Renaissance to Rock:  The Museum of Fine Arts celebrates The Art of the Guitar," Musical Merchandise Review (February 2001), p. 42.


NMM 3452. Chitarra battente, northern Italy, ca. 1680-1700. Board of Trustees, 1984.


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HARP

NMM 3387. Harp, northern Italy, ca. 1550. Ex coll.: Bisiach, Milan. Witten-Rawlins Collection, 1984.


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HARPSICHORDS
(in chronological order)

NMM 14408. Harpsichord, Naples, ca. 1530. Single manual, C/E-c3 (4 octaves), originally 1 × 8' (altered to 2 × 8' in the 17th or 18th c.). Purchase funds from the William Selz Estate, Mr. & Mrs. Clifford E. Graese Fund, and Mr. & Mrs. R. E. Rawlins Fund, 2009.

Denzil Wraight, The Stringing of Italian Keyboard Instruments c.1500—c.1650, Ph.D. thesis, The Queen’s University of Belfast, 1997, no. 641.

John Koster, "The Early Neapolitan School of Harpsichord Making," in Domenico Scarlatti en España / Domenico Scarlatti in Spain, Luisa Morales, ed. (Garrucha, Almería, Spain: Asociación Cultural LEAL, 2009), pp. 47-80 (especially p. 72 and figs. 3, 7, 11, 12, and 13).



NMM 4660. Octave virginal, Naples, ca. 1535. Single manual, C/E-c3 (4 octaves). Arne B. and Jeanne F. Larson Fund, 1989.

Lit.:  Darcy Kuronen, "Keyboard Instruments at The Shrine to Music Museum," Early Keyboard Studies Newsletter 6, No. 1 (October 1991), p. 7.

Denzil Wraight, "An Attribution of an Unsigned Spinet," FoMRHI Quarterly, No. 70 (January 1993), Communication 1150, pp. 45-46.

John Koster, "A Comment on FoMRHI Comm. 1150," FoMRHI Quarterly, No. 71 (April 1993), Communication 1166, pp. 36-37.

John Koster, Keyboard Instruments in the Museum of Fine Arts, Boston (Boston: Museum of Fine Arts, 1994), pp. 9-10.

John Koster, "Keyboard Instruments Traced Back to 16th-Century Naples," Shrine to Music Museum Newsletter 23, No. 1 (October 1995), pp. 1-3.

John Koster, "The Early Neapolitan School of Harpsichord Making," in Domenico Scarlatti en España / Domenico Scarlatti in Spain, Luisa Morales, ed. (Garrucha, Almería, Spain: Asociación Cultural LEAL, 2009), pp. 47-80 (especially p. 53 and 74 and figs. 3, 7, 11, 12, and 13).



NMM 7384.  Harpsichord by Andreas Ruckers the Elder, Antwerp, 1607

NMM 7384. Harpsichord by Andreas Ruckers the Elder, Antwerp, 1607. Harpsichord by Andreas Ruckers the Elder, Antwerp, 1607. Single manual. Single manual, now C to d3 (4+ octaves); 2 x 8' + 1 x 4', with buff stop (divided at b) simultaneously affecting both sets of 8' strings; originally C/E to c3 (4 octaves); 1 x 8' + 1 x 4', with 8' buff stop divided at f1/f#1. The earliest known dated harpsichord by Andreas Ruckers. Rose with "AR" flanking a harp-playing angel; soundboard with painted decoration including the date "1607"; although the case was redecorated during the 18th and/or 19th century, it is essentially unaltered, retaining its original dimensions, internal construction, bottom board, and tool compartment with a door in the spine. The original bridges, nuts, and key frame were retained in the petit ravalement during which the keys and action were replaced. The date "12 octobre 1757" is written on the key frame. Ex coll.: Wolfgang Ruf, Emmetten, Switzerland. Rawlins fund, 1999.

Lit.:  John Koster, "An Infinitely Precious Instrument--A Newly Discovered Harpsichord by Andreas Ruckers, Antwerp, 1607," America's Shrine to Music Museum Newsletter 27, No. 1 (February 2000), pp. 4-5 and 7.

John Koster, "A Netherlandish Harpsichord of 1658 Re-examined," Galpin Society Journal 53 (April 2000), p. 139.



NMM 12994.  Harpsichord, Naples(?), ca. 1625-1675. Inner/outer case. Single manual, GG/BB-c3 (4+ octaves); 2 × 8'. The instrument was made with divided accidentals for d-sharp/e-flat, g-sharp/a-flat, a-sharp/b-flat, c1-sharp/d1-flat, d1-sharp/e1-flat, f1-sharp/g1-flat, and g1-sharp/a1-flat. The extra accidentals (d-sharp, a-flat, a-sharp, d1-flat, d1-sharp, g1-flat, and a1-flat) were suppressed, perhaps as early as the eighteenth century, by cutting through their levers in front of the balance pins, gluing together the front portions of the divided levers, and gluing full-length ebony covers over the divided walnut substrates. Otherwise, the keyboard, including the levers for the suppressed extra accidentals, is substantially intact, and the provision for the seven extra notes in the jack guides and the pinning of the nut and bridge, etc., was retained. Gift of Joseph Rawley, Jamestown, North Carolina, 2006.

Lit.:  John Watson, "A Catalog of Antique Keyboard Instruments in the Southeast, Part II," Early Keyboard Journal, Vol. 3 (1984-85), p. 65.

John Koster, "The Early Neapolitan School of Harpsichord Making," in Domenico Scarlatti en España / Domenico Scarlatti in Spain, Luisa Morales, ed. (Garrucha, Almería, Spain: Asociación Cultural LEAL, 2009), pp. 47-80 (especially pp. 50, 59, 62, and 74 and figs. 18 and 19).



NMM 10000.  Harpsichord by Andreas Ruckers the Elder, Antwerp, 1643

NMM 10000. Harpsichord by Andreas Ruckers the Elder, Antwerp, 1643. Double manual, GG-e3 (4+ octaves); 2 x 8', 1 x 4', buff. Hand stops, shove coupler. Although the rose is missing and the batten with the maker's name is not original, the instrument is accepted by all authorities without reservation as the work of Andreas Ruckers. The original painted soundboard decoration includes the date "1643." The lid painting is attributed to Frans Francken the Younger. Originally a typical Ruckers transposing double, the instrument underwent ravalement in France, perhaps by Antoine Vater (active in Paris from 1715 to after 1759). Ex coll.: Château de Chenonceaux; Sheridan Germann, Boston. Purchase funds gift of Margaret L. Sletwold Estate and Arne B. and Jeanne F. Larson Fund, 2000.

Lit.:  Grant O'Brien, Ruckers: a Harpsichord and Virginal Building Tradition (Cambridge: Cambridge University Press, 1990), p. 267.

Sheridan Germann, "The Accidental Collector," Early Keyboard Studies Newsletter 5, No. 3 (March 1991), pp. 1-5.

Donald H. Boalch, Makers of the Harpsichord and Clavichord 1440-1840. Third edition, edited by Charles Mould (Oxford: Clarendon Press, 1995), p. 562.

Sheridan Germann, "Harpsichord Decoration: a Conspectus," in The Historical Harpsichord 4, edited by Howard Schott (Hillsdale, NY: Pendragon Press, 2002), pp. 1-213, specifically pp. 129 and 131.

John Koster, "A Second 'Infinitely Precious Instrument' by Andreas Ruckers Enters the NMM's Collections," National Music Museum Newsletter Vol. 32, No. 3 (August 2005), pp. 4-5.



NMM 3985.  Harpsichord by Gommaar van Everbroeck, Antwerp, 1659

NMM 3985. Harpsichord by Gommaar Van Everbroeck, Antwerp, 1659. Single manual, GG/BB-c3 (4+ octaves); 1 x 8', 1 x 4', buff. Painted soundboard. Marjorie T. Rawlins Collection, 1986.

Lit.:   André P. Larson, The National Music Museum: A Pictorial Souvenir (Vermillion: National Music Museum, 1988), p. 42.

Grant O'Brien, Ruckers: a Harpsichord and Virginal Building Tradition (Cambridge: Cambridge University Press, 1990), p. 153.

Darcy Kuronen, "Keyboard Instruments at The Shrine to Music Museum," Early Keyboard Studies Newsletter 6, No. 1 (October 1991), p. 7.

Donald H. Boalch, Makers of the Harpsichord and Clavichord 1440-1840. Third edition, edited by Charles Mould (Oxford: Clarendon Press, 1995), p. 308.

Sheridan Germann, "Harpsichord Decoration: A Conspectus," in Howard Schott, ed., The Historical Harpsichord, Vol. 4 (Hillsdale, NY: Pendragon Press, 2002), pp. 1-213, specifically, p. 113.

Edward L. Kottick, A History of the Harpsichord (Bloomington: Indiana University Press, 2003), p. 118.

John Koster, "Two Antwerp Harpsichords from the Second Half of the Seventeenth Century," in J. Lambrechts-Douillez and J. Koster, Mededelingen van het Ruckers-Genootschap 8 (Antwerp: Ruckers Genootschap, 2009), pp. 105-127.

John Koster, "Domenico Scarlatti and the Transformation of Iberian Harpsichord Making," in Domenico Scarlatti en España / Domenico Scarlatti in Spain, Luisa Morales, ed. (Garrucha, Almería, Spain: Asociación Cultural LEAL, 2009), pp. 187-208 (especially fig. 3a).



NMM 4657.  Harpsichord attributed to Giacomo Ridolfi, Italy, ca. 1662-1682.

NMM 4657. Harpsichord attributed to Giacomo Ridolfi, Italy, ca. 1662-1682. Inner/outer case. Single manual, C/E-c3 (4 octaves); 2 x 8'. Ex coll.: Allen Memorial Art Museum, Oberlin, Ohio. Purchase funds given by Margaret Ann Everist, Sioux City, Iowa, 1989.

Lit.:  Donald H. Boalch, Makers of the Harpsichord and Clavichord 1440-1840. Third edition, edited by Charles Mould (Oxford: Clarendon Press, 1995), p. 541.

John Koster, "Museum Collections as Resources for Musical Instrument Makers," American Lutherie 42 (Summer 1995), pp. 34-35.

André P. Larson, "Harpsichord by Giacomo Ridolfi," The South Dakota Musician (Fall 1995), cover and p. 28.

Ingrid Matthews and Byron Schenkman, In Stil Moderno: The Fantastic Style in Seventeenth-Century Italy (Berkeley, California: Wildboar, 1995). CD.

Sheridan Germann, "Harpsichord Decoration: A Conspectus," in Howard Schott, ed., The Historical Harpsichord, Vol. 4 (Hillsdale, NY: Pendragon Press, 2002), pp. 1-213, specifically, pp. 95 and 101.

Ingrid Matthews and Byron Schenkman, Canzoni da Sonar (Baton Rouge, Louisiana: Centaur, 2002). CD.

John Koster, "The Early Neapolitan School of Harpsichord Making," in Domenico Scarlatti en España / Domenico Scarlatti in Spain, Luisa Morales, ed. (Garrucha, Almería, Spain: Asociación Cultural LEAL, 2009), Table 7 (p. 70).

John Koster, "Domenico Scarlatti and the Transformation of Iberian Harpsichord Making," in Domenico Scarlatti en España / Domenico Scarlatti in Spain, Luisa Morales, ed. (Garrucha, Almería, Spain: Asociación Cultural LEAL, 2009), pp. 187-208 (especially fig. 5).



NMM 3449.  Miniature virginal by Francesco Vanini, Bologna, 1672

NMM 3449. Miniature virginal by Franciscus Vaninus, Bologna, 1672. Single manual, c/e-f2 (2+ octaves); 1 x 2'. Witten-Rawlins Collection, 1984.

Lit.:  André P. Larson, The National Music Museum: A Pictorial Souvenir (Vermillion: National Music Museum, 1988), p. 41.

Darcy Kuronen, "Keyboard Instruments at The Shrine to Music Museum," Early Keyboard Studies Newsletter 6, No. 1 (October 1991), pp. 7 & 9.

Donald H. Boalch, Makers of the Harpsichord and Clavichord 1440-1840. Third edition, edited by Charles Mould (Oxford: Clarendon Press, 1995), p. 669.


NMM 5943.  Harpsichord by Nicolas Dufour, Paris, 1683

NMM 5943. Harpsichord by Nicolas Dufour, Paris, 1683. Single manual, originally GG/BB-c3 (4+ octaves; later enlarged to AA-d3; altered in 1796 to C-f3; subsequently restored to AA-d3); 2 × 8'. Decorative painting on the soundboard attributed to an anonymous artist whose work is also found on instruments made in 1667, 1668, and 1672 by other Parisian harpsichord makers. Inscription printed on late-18th-century paper label pasted to the front edge of the wrest plank: NICOLAS DUFOUR A PARIS 1683. REPARÉ PAR H.E GRINDE EN 1796. A NICE, the first part presumably copied from the original maker's inscription. Honoré Grinde (1754-1843; sometimes spelled Grinda) was an organ builder in Nice. Ex coll.: Wolfgang Ruf, Rastatt, Germany. Rawlins fund, 1996.

Lit.:  Sheridan Germann, "Monsieur Doublet and His Confreres: The Harpsichord Decorators of Paris," pt. 2, Early Music, Vol. 9, No. 2 (April 1981), p. 192.

Michel Foussard and Jean-Loup Fontana, eds., Clans 1792, l’Orgue d’Honoré Grinda (Nice: Conseil Général des Alpes-Maritimes, 1982).

Dieter Krickeberg and Horst Rase, "Beitrage zur Kenntnis des mittel- und norddeutschen Cembalobaus um 1700," in Studia Organologica: Festschrift fur John Henry van der Meer, edited by Friedemann (Tutzing: Hans Schneider, 1987), p. 301.

Elisabeth Pastorelli, Orgues et facteurs de Nice (fin XVIIIe, début XXe siècle), (Béziers: Société de Musicologie de Languedoc, 1988).

John Koster, Keyboard Musical Instruments in the Museum of Fine Arts, Boston (Boston: Museum of Fine Arts, 1994), p. 45, note 4.

Donald H. Boalch, Makers of the Harpsichord and Clavichord 1440-1840. Third edition, edited by Charles Mould (Oxford: Clarendon Press 1995), p. 300.

John Koster, "Rare French Harpsichord Enters Museum's Collections," Shrine to Music Museum Newsletter, Vol. 23, No. 4 (August 1996), pp. 1-3.

Alain and Marie-Christine Anselm, "La Collection Yannick Guillou," Musique, Images, Instruments (Revue francaise d'organologie et d'iconographie musicale), No. 2 (1996), pp. 147-148, note 42.

Alain and Marie-Christine Anselm, "Petit prelude a l'etude des clavecins francais du XVIIe siecle," Musique, Images, Instruments (Revue francaise d'organologie et d'iconographie musicale), No. 2 (1996), p. 228.

Denzil Wraight, The Stringing of Italian Keyboard Instruments c.1500-c.1650 (Ph.D. thesis, The Queen’s University of Belfast, 1996; revised 1997), vol. 1, p. 179.

Alain and Marie-Christine Anselm, "Le deux clavecins signés 'J. Collesse', 1768 et 1775," Musique, Images, Instruments (Revue francaise d'organologie et d'iconographie musicale), No. 4 (1999), p. 84, note 16.

R. Dean Anderson, "Extant Harpsichords Built or Rebuilt in France During the Seventeenth and Eighteenth Centuries: an Overview and Annotated List, Part 1," Early Keyboard Journal 19 (2001), pp. 137-138.

John Koster, "Traditional Iberian Harpsichord Making in its European Context," Galpin Society Journal 61 (2008), pp. 10, 58, 67.

Charles Astro, Robert Adelson, et al., Trois siècles de facture instrumentale à Nice, exhibition catalogue, Musée du Palais Lascaris (Nice: Éditions Nice Musées, 2009), p. 21.

John Koster, "Domenico Scarlatti and the Transformation of Iberian Harpsichord Making," in Domenico Scarlatti en España / Domenico Scarlatti in Spain, Luisa Morales, ed. (Garrucha, Almería, Spain: Asociación Cultural LEAL, 2009), pp. 187-208 (especially fig. 4).



NMM 10773.  Spinet by Charles Haward, London, 1689

NMM 10773. Spinet by Charles Haward, London, 1689. Single manual, GG/BB-c3 with divided E-flat (4+ octaves). Acquired in memory of Tony (1961-2003) and Bonnie (1962-2003) Vinatieri, The Tony and Bonnie Vinatieri Family Trust, Marina Del Rey, California, 2004.

Lit.:  Donald H. Boalch, Makers of the Harpsichord and Clavichord 1440-1840. Third edition, edited by Charles Mould (Oxford: Clarendon Press, 1995), pp. 378-379.

John Koster, "The Diary of Samuel Pepys and the NMM’s Recently Acquired Spinet by Charles Haward, London, 1689," National Music Museum Newsletter 31, No. 4 (November 2004), pp. 4-5.

Darryl Martin, "The Native Tradition in Transition: English Hrpsichords circa 1680-1725," in John Koster, ed.,  Aspects of Harpsichord Making in the British Isles (The Historical Harpsichord, Vol. 5; Hillsdale, NY: Pendragon Press, 2009), pp. 1-115, specifically p. 16.



NMM 6041.  Octave virginal by Onofrio Guarracino, Naples, 1694

NMM 6041. Octave virginal by Onofrio Guarracino, Naples, 1694. Single manual, C/E-c3 (4 octaves). Purchase funds gift of Margaret Ann and Hubert H. Everist, Sioux City, Iowa, 1997.

Lit.:  John Koster, "Museum Acquires Rare 17th-Century Italian Virginal," America's Shrine to Music Museum Newsletter 24, No. 3 (April 1997), pp. 1-2.

David Schulenberg, Music of the Baroque (Oxford: Oxford University Press, 2001), p. 29.

John Koster, "The Early Neapolitan School of Harpsichord Making," in Domenico Scarlatti en España / Domenico Scarlatti in Spain, Luisa Morales, ed. (Garrucha, Almería, Spain: Asociación Cultural LEAL, 2009), pp. 47-80 (especially p. 75 and figs. 4 and 10).


NMM 3870. Harpsichord, Italy, ca. 1700. Single manual, C/E-c3 (4 octaves); 3 x 8'. (Spurious signature on later nameboard: Giuseppe Oreibla Fece / in Sinigalia nell'anno 1774.) Marjorie T. Rawlins Collection, 1985.

Lit.:   André P. Larson, The National Music Museum: A Pictorial Souvenir (Vermillion: National Music Museum, 1988), pp. 19 and 45.

Darcy Kuronen, "Keyboard Instruments at The Shrine to Music Museum," Early Keyboard Studies Newsletter 6, No. 1 (October 1991), p. 7.

Donald H. Boalch, Makers of the Harpsichord and Clavichord 1440-1840. Third edition, edited by Charles Mould (Oxford: Clarendon Press, 1995), p. 518.


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HORNS
(in chronological order)

NMM 7490. Hunting horn by Crétien, Vernon, Normandy, ca. 1650. Semicircular (demi-lune) shape. Stamped above bell garland: VERNON [forward facing stag leaping to right]. Garland decorated with five-petal flowers engraved around circumference. Joe R. and Joella F. Utley Collection, 2000.


NMM 7213. Miniature natural horn by Johann Wilhelm Haas, Imperial City of Nürnberg, 1681. Engraved on bell garland: [forward facing hare leaping to left] I · W · H and IOHANN · WILHELM · HAAS · NVRNB 1681. Single-coiled, one-piece, solid silver body; mouthpiece, garland and bell interior gold-plated. Tassels of yellow, red, and green silk threads, fixed to the eyelets by leather bindings and held together by a wooden knob covered by threads of the same material, woven in a zigzag pattern. Garland decorated with four cast angel heads with wings, engravings of flowers, and elaborately punched and engraved scallop shells. City inspection mark, N, stamped on bell. Ex coll.: Ernst W. Buser, Binningen, Switzerland. Joe R. and Joella F. Utley Collection, 1999.

Lit.:  Sabine Klaus, "Haas & Haas: A Miniature Horn and a Natural Trumpet from the Most Famous Nürnberg Workshop," America's Shrine to Music Museum Newsletter 28, No. 2 (May 2001), pp. 4-5.

Karin Tebbe, Ursula Timann, and Thomas Eser, Nürnberger Goldschmiedekunst 1541-1868, Band I. Meister, Werke, Marken (Nürnberg: Verlag des Germanischen Nationalmuseums, 2007), Teil 1: Text, p. 505; Teil 2: Tafeln, 993.


NMM 7459. Natural horn in F by Johann Carl Kodisch, Imperial City of Nürnberg, 1684. Engraved on bell garland: I C K [forward facing horse leaping to left] and MACHT · IOHANN · CARL · KODISH · NVRNBERG 1684. Single-coiled, two-piece brass body with continuous conical bore; ferrules and garland with remnants of silver-plating. The overlapping tab seam is not placed at the inner curve of the bell, as is usually the case, but is turned 90°; therefore, it is in the plane that is least affected by the bending. Garland decorated with cast figures depicting a hunting scene (including one hunter playing a horn, two dogs, one hunter with gun, a boar, a fox, and a hare), engraved leaves, and scallop design.  Ex coll.: Walter J. Erdmann, Goslar.  Joe R. and Joella F. Utley Collection, 2000.

Lit.:  Sabine Klaus, "Acquisition of a Superb Horn Built by Johann Carl Kodisch in 1684 Helps Preserve a House Built in Germany in 1510," America's Shrine to Music Museum Newsletter 28, No. 3 (August 2001), pp. 4-5.


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LIRAS DA BRACCIO
(in chronological order)

NMM 4203.  Lira da braccio by Francesco Linarol, Venice, 1563. Ex coll.: W. E. Hill & Sons, London. Rawlins Fund, 1988. Technical drawing available.


NMM 3427. Lira da braccio (now a viola) attributed to Ventura di Francesco Linarol, Venice, ca. 1580. Ex coll.: Bisiach, Milan. Witten-Rawlins Collection, 1984.


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LUTES
(in chronological order)

NMM 3384. Treble lute marked D. G., northern Italy, ca. 1500. Ex coll.: Lord Waldorf Astor, Cliveden. Witten-Rawlins Collection, 1984. Technical drawing available.


NMM 3381. Bass lute (formerly a theorbo) by Andrea Harton, Venice, ca. 1600. Ex coll.: Lord Waldorf Astor, Hever Castle. Witten-Rawlins Collection, 1984.


NMM 3382. Archlute by Magnus Tieffenbrucker, Venice, ca. 1600. Ex coll.: Lord Waldorf Astor, Hever Castle. Witten-Rawlins Collection, 1984.


NMM 10214. Lute attributed to the Tieffenbrucker family, Padua, ca. 1600, modified by Thomas Edlinger, Prague, 1724. Ex coll.:  Carl Des Fours Walderode, Hrubý Rohozec Castle, Bohemia (Czech Republic). Purchase funds gift of Margaret Ann Everist, Sioux City, Iowa, 2002. Technical drawing available.

Lit.: Robert Lundberg, "Sixteenth and Seventeenth Century Lute-Making," Journal of the Lute Society of America 7 (1974), pp. 33 and 48.

Robert Lundberg, Historical Lute Construction (Tacoma, Washington: Guild of American Luthiers, 2002), pp. 15, 19, 62-63, and 251 (no. 51 in list).

André P. Larson, "From a Bohemian Castle . . . Unraveling the 400-Year Saga of Italian Lutes Built About 1600," National Music Museum Newsletter 29, No. 4 (November 2002), pp. 1-3.

André P. Larson, "From a Bohemian Castle . . . Unraveling the 400-Year Saga of Italian Lutes Built Around 1600," Lute Society of America Quarterly 44, No. 1 (February 2009), cover and pp. 6-8.

Bernard Hentrich, "Eine Theorbe von Silvius Leopold Weiß?," in Christian Ahrens and Gregor Klinke, eds., Laute und Theorbe: Symposium im Rahmen der 31. Tage Alter Musik in Herne 2006 (Munich and Salzburg: Musikverlag Katzbichler, 2009), pp. 161-163.


NMM 3383. Archlute by Pieter Railich for Matteo Sellas, Venice, 1630. Ex coll.: Lord Waldorf Astor, Hever Castle. Witten-Rawlins Collection, 1984.


NMM 5580. Pamir robab (long-neck lute), Pamir region of Central Asia, ca. 1650. Board of Trustees, 1993.

Lit.:  "Important Instruments Acquired in 1993," The Shrine to Music Museum Newsletter 21, No. 2 (January 1994), p. 4.


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MANDOLINS

NMM 6045. Choral mandolino, The Cutler-Challen, by Antonio Stradivari, Cremona, 1680. Purchase funds gift of Mr. and Mrs. Richard A. Cutler, Sioux Falls, South Dakota, 1997. Technical drawing available.

Lit.:  James Tyler and Paul Sparks, Early Mandolin: Mandolino and the Neapolitan Mandoline (Oxford: Oxford University Press, 1992), p. 168.

Andrew Dipper, "The Geometric Construction of the Violin Forms of Antonio Stradivari," Journal of the Violin Society of America 10, No. 2 (1988), pp. 163-198.

André P. Larson, "Choral Mandolino," South Dakota Musician 33, No. 1 (Fall 1998), cover and p. 19.

André P. Larson, Beethoven & Berlioz, Paris & Vienna: Musical Treasures from the Age of Revolution & Romance 1789-1848, with essay by John Koster, exhibition catalog, Washington Pavilion, Sioux Falls, South Dakota, September 12-November 2, 2003 (Vermillion: National Music Museum 2003), p. 68.


NMM 3435. Mandolin attributed to Francesco Presbler, Milan, ca. 1680. Ex coll.: Lord Astor, Hever Castle, England. Witten-Rawlins Collection, 1984.

Lit.:  André P. Larson, Beethoven & Berlioz, Paris & Vienna: Musical Treasures from the Age of Revolution & Romance 1789-1848, with essay by John Koster, exhibition catalog, Washington Pavilion, Sioux Falls, South Dakota, September 12-November 2, 2003 (Vermillion: National Music Museum 2003), p. 69.


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OBOE

NMM 4074. Oboe by Abraham van Aardenberg, Amsterdam, ca. 1698-1717. Stamped on all three joints: [deer] / AARDENBERG [in a scroll] / [two trefoils, three fleurs-de-lis]. Boxwood, stained. Three brass keys. SATW. Length 578 mm. Arne B. and Jeanne F. Larson Endowment Fund, 1986.

Lit.:  Phillip T. Young, 4,900 Historical Woodwind Instruments: An Inventory of 200 Makers in International Collections (London: Tony Bingham, 1993), p. 3.


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ORGAN

  NMM 4031. Chest organ by Johannes Jacob Hannss, northern Germany, ca. 1620. Engraved on a square tin pipe: Joh / Jacob / Hannss / C. Single manual (45 keys; short octave), hand-operated bellows. Six stops; 390 pipes. Marjorie T. Rawlins Collection, 1986.

Stop list:

Doppelter Zimbal 1/6'
Flöte Major 8'
Flöte Minor 4'
Oktave 2'
Doppelte Mixtur 1/2'
Prinzipal 1'


Lit.:  1986 Acquisitions at USD Music Museum," Newsletter of the American Musical Instrument Society 16, No. 1 (February 1987), p. 6.

André P. Larson, The National Music Museum: A Pictorial Souvenir (Vermillion: National Music Museum, 1988), p. 43.

Darcy Kuronen, "Keyboard Instruments at The Shrine to Music Museum," Early Keyboard Studies Newsletter 6, No. 1 (October 1991), p. 10.

Jürgen-Peter Schindler, Die Nürnberger Stadtorgelmacher und ihre Instrument (Nürnberg: Verlag des Germanischen Nationalmuseums, 1995), pp. 49, 60, 72, 84.


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PERCUSSION SLAB

NMM 5788. Gyo ban (fish-shaped percussion slab), Japan, Edo period (1600-1867). Purchase funds gift of Toshiba America Information Systems, Inc., Mitchell, South Dakota, 1994.

Lit.:  "Japanese 'Fish' a Highlight . . . 1994 Acquisitions Include Rare Pianos, Harp, Woodwinds," The Shrine to Music Museum Newsletter, Vol. 22, No. 2 (January 1995), p. 1.


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POCHETTES AND KITS
(in chronological order)

NMM 2538.  Pochette attributed to Bohemia, ca. 1600-1650. Made perhaps by a Romany craftsman near Prague. Board of Trustees, 1979.

Lit.:  André P. Larson, The National Music Museum: A Pictorial Souvenir (Vermillion: National Music Museum, 1988), p. 53.


NMM 3350. Pochette, France, ca. 1650-1675. Ex coll.: Emil Herrmann, Stepney, Connecticut. Witten-Rawlins Collection, 1984.

Lit.:  André P. Larson, The National Music Museum: A Pictorial Souvenir (Vermillion: National Music Museum, 1988), p. 53.


NMM 3591.  Pochette, France, ca. 1650-1675. Rawlins Fund, 1985.

Lit.:  André P. Larson, The National Music Museum: A Pictorial Souvenir (Vermillion: National Music Museum, 1988), p. 53.


NMM 4543.  Pochette possibly by Jacque Regnau[l]t, Paris, ca. 1650-1675. Ex coll.: W. E. Hill & Sons, London. Board of Trustees, 1988.

Lit.:  Made for Music:  An Exhibition to Mark the 40th Anniversary of the Galpin Society for the Study of Musical Instruments (Amersham: Halstan & Co., 1986), p. 43, plate 11.

Friedemann Hellwig, "Hamburg and Paris: Joachim Tielke's Pochettes," Galpin Socity Journal 62 (2009), pp. 183-190.


NMM 4542. Pochette labelled Joachim Tielke, Hamburg, 1671, possibly made for Tielke by Jacque Regnau[l]t, Paris, 1671. Ex coll.: W. E. Hill & Sons, London. Board of Trustees, 1988.

Lit.:  An Illustrated Catalog of the Music Loan Exhibition Held . . . by the Worshipful Company of Musicians at Fishmongers' Hall, June and July 1904 (London: Novello, 1909), p. 160.

Georg Kinsky, Musikhistorisches Museum von Wilhelm Heyer in Cöln, Katalog, Vol. 2 (Leipzig: Breitkopf & Härtel, 1912), p. 645.

Günther Hellwig, "Joachim Tielke," Galpin Society Journal 17 (1964), p. 34.

Anthony Baines, European and American Musical Instruments (London: Batsford, 1966), plate 43, p. 10.

Gunther Hellwig, Joachim Tielke (Frankfurt: Verlag das Musikinstrument, 1980), pp. 52, 73-74, 120, 139-140.

Made for Music:  An Exhibition to Mark the 40th Anniversary of the Galpin Society for the Study of Musical Instruments (Amersham: Halstan & Co., 1986), p. 43, plate 11.

"1988 Acquisitions at USD Music Museum," Newsletter of the American Musical Instrument Society 18, No. 1 (February 1989), p. 9.

"Recent Acquisitions Await New Galleries," Shrine to Music Museum Newsletter 16, No. 3 (April 1989), p. 2.

[Detail of the head of NMM 4542], Shrine to Music Museum Newsletter 17, No. 3 (April 1990), p. 4.

Paul R. Laird, "That Gut Feeling: The World of Early Strings—The Shrine to Music Museum," Continuo (June 1996), p. 16.

Friedemann Hellwig, "Hamburg and Paris: Joachim Tielke's Pochettes," Galpin Socity Journal 62 (2009), pp. 183-190.


NMM 4651. Pochette by Mathias Wörle, Augsburg, 1691. Ex coll.: Baron Armand van Zuylen, Liège. Arne B. and Jeanne F. Larson Fund, 1989.

Lit.:  Important Musical Instruments Including the Van Zuylen Collection of Early Instruments (London: Christie, Manson & Woods, March 16, 1988), lot 191, p. 43.

"It's Been an Incredible Decade . . . Museum Makes Important Acquisitions Again in 1989," Shrine to Music Museum Newsletter 17, No. 2 (January 1990), p. 7.

"1989 Acquisitions at USD Music Museum," Newsletter of the American Musical Instrument Society 19, No. 1 (February 1990), p. 16.

André P. Larson, Amadeus:   His Music and the Instruments of Eighteenth-century Vienna, exhibition catalog, Dahl Fine Arts Center, Rapid City, South Dakota, February 4-March 2, 1990 (Vermillion: National Music Museum, 1990), p. 8.

Paul R. Laird, "That Gut Feeling: The World of Early Strings—The Shrine to Music Museum," Continuo (June 1996), p. 16.


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DESCANT (SOPRANO) RECORDER

NMM 4202.  Descant (soprano) recorder by Richard Haka, Amsterdam, ca. 1680. Stamped on both joints, R. HAKA (within a scroll) / [lily]. Two sections, ebony with ivory beak and trim. Thumbhole and eight fingerholes (duplicate holes for the little finger). Length, 343 mm. Original, fitted, tooled (brown and gilt) leather-covered case. Arne B. & Jeanne F. Larson Fund, 1988.

Lit.:   André P. Larson, The National Music Museum: A Pictorial Souvenir (Vermillion: National Music Museum, 1988), p. 39.

Wendy Powers, "Checklist of Historic Recorders in American Private and Public Collections," The American Recorder 30, No. 2 (May 1989), pp. 61-62.

Jan Bouterse, "Historical Dutch Recorders in American Collections," American Recorder, Vol. 33, No. 3 (September 1992), pp. 15-16.


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TREBLE (ALTO) RECORDERS
(in chronological order)

NMM 4504. Treble (alto) recorder in F by Jan Juriaensz van Heerde, Amsterdam, ca. 1670. Stamped just below the window, I.V.H. (in a scroll). One-piece, Indian ivory body, thumbhole and eight fingerholes (the duplicate hole for the left little finger is plugged). Length, 465 mm. Rawlins Fund, 1987. Technical drawing available.

Lit.: "1987 Acquisitions at USD Music Museum," American Musical Instrument Society Newsletter Vol. 17, No. 2 (June 1988), p. 2.

Wendy Powers, "Checklist of Historic Recorders in American Private and Public Collections," The American Recorder, Vol. 30, No. 2 (May 1989), p. 62.

Jan Bouterse, "Historical Dutch Recorders in American Collections," American Recorder, Vol. 33, No. 3 (September 1992), pp. 14-15.


NMM 3978. Treble (alto) recorder in F by Abraham van Aardenberg, Amsterdam, 1698-1717. Stamped on all three joints, [animal] / AARDENBERG (within a scroll) / [three fleurs-de-lis]. (Langwill believes the animal to be deer rampant--an Aardenberg oboe [NMM 4074] in the Museum's collections has a running deer above the name--however, it is not a deer on this recorder, but perhaps the profile of a bird standing upright). Three sections, stained boxwood, thumbhole and six fingerholes on the main joint, one fingerhole on the foot joint. Length, 504 mm. Board of Trustees, 1986.

Lit.:  Wendy Powers, "Checklist of Historic Recorders in American Private and Public Collections," The American Recorder 30, No. 2 (May 1989), p. 62.

Jan Bouterse, "Historical Dutch Recorders in American Collections," American Recorder, Vol. 33, No. 3 (September 1992), pp. 58, 62.


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BASS RECORDERS
(in chronological order)

NMM 3606.  Bass (basset) recorder in G attributed to Arzazius or Hans Schnitzer, Munich or Imperial City of Nürnberg, ca. 1550. Stamped twice just below the window with the same maker's mark that is also found on five srayffaiff (schreyerpfeife) from Rožmberk, inventoried in 1599 and 1600, now in the Národní Muzeum in Prague. One piece, boxwood with brass trim, thumbhole and six fingerholes. One brass key with swallowtail touchpiece and a flat, round cover with the pad sewn to the cover. SATW. Key covered with a perforated wood fontanelle (sleeve). Length, 918 mm. Ex coll.: Canon Francis W. Galpin, Harlow, England. Arne B. & Jeanne F. Larson Fund, 1985.

Lit.:  An Illustrated Catalogue of the Music Loan Exhibition Held ... by the Worshipful Company of Musicians of Fishmongers' Hall, June and July 1904 (London: Novello, 1909), pp. 181-182.

André P. Larson, "Original Bass Recorders in the United States," The American Recorder 26, No. 4 (November 1985), cover and pp. 171-172.

"Renaissance bass (basset) recorder," Newsletter of the American Musical Instrument Society 15, No. 3 (October 1986), pp. 8-9.

André P. Larson, The National Music Museum: A Pictorial Souvenir(Vermillion: National Music Museum, 1988), p. 36.

Wendy Powers, "Checklist of Historic Recorders in American Private and Public Collections," The American Recorder 30, No. 2 (May 1989), p. 62.


NMM 3605. Bass recorder in F by Johann Christoph Denner, Imperial City of Nürnberg, ca. 1700. Stamped on head and foot joints, I. C. DENNER (within a scroll) / D. Three sections, with a detachable head cap encircled with a brass band. Detachable bocal enters at the top. Fruitwood. Thumbhole and six fingerholes on the main joint. One brass key with a flat, square key cover (corners cut) and a round touchpiece, for the left little finger, on the foot joint. SATW. A crack in the main joint shows an early repair, with two small pieces of wood that match the wood of the body set across the crack to hold it together. Length, 1035 mm. Ex coll.: de Bricqueville, Versailles. Board of Trustees, 1985.

Lit.:  André P. Larson, "Original Bass Recorders in the United States," The American Recorder 26, No. 4 (November 1985), cover and pp. 171-172.

André P. Larson, The National Music Museum: A Pictorial Souvenir (Vermillion: National Music Museum, 1988), p. 36.

Wendy Powers, "Checklist of Historic Recorders in American Private and Public Collections," The American Recorder 30, No. 2 (May 1989), p. 62.


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SHOFAR

NMM 2369. Shofar, Poland, 17th-18th century. Ex coll.: Carol Geller, Vienna. Board of Trustees, 1990.


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TIMPANI

NMM 7448 a & b. Pair of timpani, Prussia or Bavaria, ca. 1660-1700. Joe R. and Joella F. Utley Collection, 2000.

Lit.:  Jayson Dobney, "Historic Timpani at the National Music Museum," Percussive Notes 45, No. 2 (April 2007): 16.


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TROMBONES
(in chronological order)

NMM 3592. Tenor slide trombone by Michael Nagel, Imperial City of Nürnberg, 1656. Engraved on bell garland: MACHT MICHAEL NAGEL NVR 1656 / M N / [bird]. Slide may be an early 18th-century replacement. Ex coll.: Bohland & Fuchs, Graslitz, Bohemia. Purchase funds given by Mr. and Mrs. Clifford E. Graese, Saddle River, New Jersey, 1985.

Lit.:  "1985 Acquisitions at USD Music Museum," Newsletter of the American Musical Instrument Society 15, No. 1 (February 1985), p. 9.

Larry Kitzel, "The Trombones of The Shrine to Music Museum," D.M.A. dissertation, University of Oklahoma, 1985, pp. 234-235.

Margaret Downie Banks, "17th-and 18th-Century Brass Instruments at The Shrine to Music Museum," Brass Bulletin 58, No. 2 (1987), pp. 52, 54, and 56.

André P. Larson, The National Music Museum: A Pictorial Souvenir(Vermillion: National Music Museum, 1988), p. 39.


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TRUMPETS
(in chronological order)

NMM 3873. Trumpet by Paul Hainlein, Imperial City of Nürnberg, 1666. Engraved on bell garland: MACHT PAVL / HAINLEIN / [hen facing left, sitting on nest] / P. H. / IN NVRNBERG / ANNO 1666. Composite trumpet probably made from remnants of two or more period instruments; original bell. Board of Trustees, 1985.

Lit.:  Margaret Downie Banks, "17th-and 18th-Century Brass Instruments at The Shrine to Music Museum," Brass Bulletin 58, No. 2 (1987), pp. 52-54 and 56.

André P. Larson, The National Music Museum: A Pictorial Souvenir (Vermillion: National Music Museum, 1988), p. 34.

Mary Oleskiewicz, "The Rise of Italian Chamber Music," Chapter Three in The World of Baroque Music:  New Perspectives, edited by George B. Stauffer (Bloomington: Indiana University Press, 2006), p. 50 and plate 10.

Paul Voet, De Eeuwigheid van Trompetten en Trompetters: Ontstaan en Evolutie (Wormerveer, The Netherlands: Molenaar Edition BV, 2006), p. 118, fig. 78.


NMM 3600. Trumpet by Johann Wilhelm Haas, Imperial City of Nürnberg, ca. 1690-1710. Engraved on bell garland: [hare running to the left ] / I W HAAS, Fec. Noriberg.  Board of Trustees, 1985.

Lit.:  "1985 Acquisitions at USD Music Museum," Newsletter of the American Musical Instrument Society 15, No. 1 (February 1986), p. 8.

Margaret Downie Banks, "17th-and 18th-Century Brass Instruments at The Shrine to Music Museum," Brass Bulletin 58, No. 2 (1987), pp. 52-54 and 56.

André P. Larson, The National Music Museum: A Pictorial Souvenir (Vermillion: National Music Museum, 1988), pp. 34-35.

David Schulenberg, Music of the Baroque (Oxford: Oxford University Press, 2001), p. 270.

Mary Oleskiewicz, "The Rise of Italian Chamber Music," Chapter Three in The World of Baroque Music:  New Perspectives, edited by George B. Stauffer (Bloomington: Indiana University Press, 2006), p. 50 and plate 10.

Paul Voet, De Eeuwigheid van Trompetten en Trompetters: Ontstaan en Evolutie (Wormerveer, The Netherlands: Molenaar Edition BV, 2006), p. 118, fig. 78.


NMM 4013. Trumpet by Georg Friedrich Steinmez, Imperial City of Nürnberg, before 1694. Coiled. Engraved on bell garland: G F S [orb] / MACHT GEORG F.RICH STEINMEZ IN NURNBERG. Silver-plated garland decorated with engraved flowers, leaves, and scallop design in repoussé. Gift of Barbara and Burton E. Hardin, Charleston, Illinois, 1986.

Lit.:  "Rare 18th-Century Hunting Horn Donated," Shrine to Music Museum Newsletter 14, No. 1 (October 1986), p. 4.

"1986 Acquisitions at USD Music Museum," Newsletter of the American Musical Instrument Society 15, No. 1 (February 1987), p. 7.

Margaret Downie Banks, "17th-and 18th-Century Brass Instruments at The Shrine to Music Museum,"Brass Bulletin 58, No. 2 (1987), pp. 57-58.

André P. Larson, The National Music Museum: A Pictorial Souvenir (Vermillion: National Music Museum, 1988), p. 35.

Thomas Tritle, "Horns in The Shrine to Music Museum," Horn Call (October 1988), p. 31.

Sabine Klaus, "Horn oder Trompete? Ein Instrument von Johann Carl Kodisch, Nürnberg 1684," Jagd- und Waldhörner. Geschichte und musikalische Nutzung. Michaelsteiner Konferenzberichte, Vol. 70, ed. by Boje E. Hans Schmuhl and Monika Lustig (Augsburg: Wißner, 2006), pp. 155-176.


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TRUMPET MARINE

NMM 10928. Trumpet marine (tromba marina, trumscheit), Switzerland, 1675-1750. Ex colls.: Heinrich Schumacher, Tribschen (Lucerne); Karl Mangold, Zolliken (Zurich), Switzerland. Jean M. Abramson Estate, Laurium, Michigan, 2006.


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VELTSCHALMEY

NMM 4545. Veltschalmey (Deutsche Schalmei, treble shawm) by Richard Haka, Amsterdam, ca. 1690. Stamped on both joints: R. HAKA [in a scroll] / [fleur-de-lis]. Boxwood with brass ferrules. No keys. No holes doubled. Three vent holes in bell (one under fontanelle). Peg in bell. Length, without later pirouette, 621 mm. Ex coll.: J. W. Mengelberg, Amsterdam. Board of Trustees, 1988.

Lit.:  "Major Double-Reed Exhibition in August," Newsletter of the American Musical Instrument Society 17, No. 1 (February 1988), p. 10.

Phillip T. Young, Loan Exhibition of Historic Double Reed Instruments (Victoria: University of Victoria, 1988), No. 4.

"1988 Acquisitions at USD Music Museum," Newsletter of the American Musical Instrument Society 18, No. 1 (February 1989), p. 10.

"Lobby Exhibit Features Recent Acquisitions," The Shrine to Music Museum Newsletter 16, No. 4 (July 1989), p. 3.

Phillip T. Young, 4,900 Historical Woodwind Instruments: An Inventory of 200 Makers in International Collections (London: Tony Bingham, 1993), p. 119.

Jan Bouterse, "The Deutsche Schalmeien of Richard Haka," Journal of the American Musical Instrument Society 25 (1999), pp. 65, 70, 74, 79, 80-81.

David Schulenberg, Music of the Baroque (Oxford: Oxford University Press, 2001), p. 268.


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TREBLE VIOLA DA GAMBA

NMM 3986. Treble viol by John Hoskin, England, 1609. Ex coll.: W. E. Hill & Sons, London; John Pringle, Chapel Hill. Board of Trustees, 1986. Technical drawing available.


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TENOR VIOLA DA GAMBA

NMM 4573. Tenor viol by Gregor Karpp, Königsberg, East Prussia, 1693. Period case. Ex coll.: Canon Francis W. Galpin, Harlow, England. Arne B. and Jeanne F. Larson Fund, 1989.

Lit:  Sotheby's Musical Instruments:  November 23-25, 1988 (London: Sotheby's, 1988), Lot No. 663, pp. 296-297.

Herbert Heyde, Musikinstrumentenbau in Preussen (Tutzing: Hans Schneider, 1994), pp. 370-371, 373.

John Koster, "Museum Collections as Resources for Musical Instrument Makers," American Lutherie, 42 (Summer 1995), p. 29.

David Schulenberg, Music of the Baroque (Oxford: Oxford University Press, 2001), p. 45.


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BASS VIOLAS DA GAMBA
(in chronological order)

NMM 3375. Bass viola da gamba, Venetian school, ca. 1540. Ex coll.: Bisiach, Milan. Witten-Rawlins Collection, 1984.


NMM 3376. Bass viola da gamba by Zanetto di Montichiaro, Brescia, before 1560. Ex colls.: Correr, Venice; Bisiach, Milan. Witten-Rawlins Collection, 1984.


NMM 3377. Bass viola da gamba by Ventura di Francesco Linarol, Venice, 1582. Ex colls.: Correr, Venice; Bisiach, Milan. Witten-Rawlins Collection, 1984. Technical drawing available.


NMM 3378. Bass viola da gamba by Gasparo da Salò, Brescia, before 1609. Converted to a violoncello, probably in the 19th century. Ex coll.: Beare, London. Witten-Rawlins Collection, 1984.


NMM 3431. Contrabass viola da gamba attributed to Gasparo da Salò, Brescia, before 1609. Ex coll.: Bisiach, Milan. Witten-Rawlins Collection, 1984.


NMM 3430. Bass viola da gamba attributed to Giovanni Paolo Maggini, Brescia, before 1630. Ex coll.: Bisiach, Milan. Witten-Rawlins Collection, 1984.


NMM 3432. Contrabass viola da gamba attributed to Giovanni Paolo Maggini, Brescia, before 1630. Ex coll.: Bisiach, Milan. Witten-Rawlins Collection 1984.


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VIOLAS
(in chronological order)

NMM 3370. Viola by Andrea Amati, Cremona, ca. 1560. Ex colls.: C. B. Lutyens, Amwell Grove, England; Hope Hambourg; E. R. Voigt, London. Witten-Rawlins Collection, 1984. Consult the Luthier's Library for detailed measurements and photos.

Lit.:  [Arthur Beare], "Viola by Andrea Amati," The Strad 35, No. 419 (March 1925), pp. 705-706.

"Andrea Amati," The Strad 70, No. 832 (August 1959), pp. 118-119.

Laurence C. Witten, "The Surviving Instruments of Andrea Amati," Early Music 10, No. 4 (October 1982), p. 489.

Andrea Mosconi and Laurence C. Witten, Capolavori di Andrea Amati (Cremona: Ente Triennale Internazionale degli Strumenti ad Arco, 1984), pp. 47-52 and 68.

Margaret Downie Banks, "The Witten-Rawlins Collection and Other Early Italian Stringed Instruments at The Shrine to Music Museum," Journal of the Violin Society of America 8, No. 3 (1987), pp. 30-31 and 37-39.

André P. Larson, The National Music Museum: A Pictorial Souvenir (Vermillion: National Music Museum, 1988), p. 49.

Maurice W. Riley, The History of the Viola, Volume II (Ann Arbor, Michigan: Braun-Brumfield, 1991), pp. 8-9.

Renato Meucci, editor, Un corpo alla ricerca dell'anima . . . Andrea Amati and the Birth of the Violin 1505-2005, Exhibition Catalog, Vol. 1 (Cremona: Ente Triennale Internazionale degli Strumenti ad Arco Consorzio Liutai Antonio Stradivari Cremona, 2005), pp. 161-169.

Renato Meucci, Strumentaio: Il costruttore di strumenti musicali nella tradizione occidentale (Venice: Marsilio Editori, 2008), p. 80, fig. 7.


NMM 3367. Viola by Peregrino di Zanetto, Brescia, after 1564. Witten-Rawlins Collection, 1984.


NMM 3368. Viola by Gasparo Bertolotti da Salò, Brescia, before 1609. Ex colls.: Joseph Joachim; Joseph Vieland. Witten-Rawlins Collection, 1984. Consult the Luthier's Library for detailed measurements and photos.

Lit.:  "N.Y. Times Carries Story . . .  Purchase of Witten Collection Attracts Widespread Attention," Shrine to Music Museum, Inc., Newsletter, 11, No. 4 (July 1984), pp. 1-3.

Roger Hargrave, "Preservation Order," The Strad 96, No. 1142 (June 1985), p. 127.

André P. Larson, The National Music Museum: A Pictorial Souvenir (Vermillion: National Music Museum, 1988), p. 48.

Maurice W. Riley, The History of The Viola, Vol. II (Ann Arbor, Michigan: Braum-Brumfield, 1991), pp. 18 and 20.

Kurt Kauert, Vogtländisch-westböhmischer Geigenbau in vier Jahrhunderten (Schneeberg: Sächsische Landesstelle für Volkskultur, 2006), p. 20.


NMM 4881. Viola by Ernst Busch, Imperial City of Nürnberg, 1641. Arne B. and Jeanne F. Larson Fund, 1989.


NMM 3371. Tenor viola by Jacob Stainer, Absam bei Innsbruck, ca. 1650. Ex colls.: Hermann Hammig, Berlin; Fridolin Hamma, Stuttgart. Witten-Rawlins Collection, 1984. Consult the Luthier's Library for detailed measurements and photos.

Lit.:  Darren Freeman, "Think Big," The Strad 121, No. 1439 (March 2010): cover, pp. 29-34.

Poster, Stainer Tenor Viola c. 1650 (London: The Strad, 2010).


NMM 3354. Tenor viola by Andrea Guarneri, Cremona, 1664. Ex colls.: N. H. Conte Pietro Canal, Patrizio Veneto (Patrician of Venice); Laura di Tocco Canal, Milan; Andrea Bisiach, Milan. Witten-Rawlins Collection, 1984. Technical drawing available (consult the Luthier's Library for additional measurements and photos).

Lit.: "Witten Collection Acquired," Shrine to Music Museum, Inc., Newsletter 11, No. 3 (April 1984), p. 3.

"Witten Collection is Acquired by Shrine to Music Museum at USD," Newsletter of the American Musical Instrument Society 13, No. 3 (October 1984), p. 1.

Roger Hargrave, "Preservation Order," The Strad 96, No. 1142 (June 1985), pp. 124 and 127.

Margaret Downie Banks, "The Witten-Rawlins Collection and Other Early Italian Stringed Instruments at The Shrine to Music Museum," Journal of the Violin Society of America 8, No. 3 (1987), pp. 37-39.

André P. Larson, The National Music Museum: A Pictorial Souvenir (Vermillion: National Music Museum, 1988), pp. 5 and 48.

William L. Monical, Shapes of the Baroque: The Historical Development of Bowed String Instruments (The American Federation of Violin and Bow Makers, 1989), pp. 72-73.

Herbert W. Myers, "The Renaissance Violin: An Introduction for Players," Strings 4, No. 5 (March/April 1990), p. 37.

Maurice W. Riley, The History of the Viola, Volume II (Ann Arbor, Michigan: Braun-Brumfield, 1991), pp. 13-14.

Experience the World of Music: Orange County Philharmonic Society 1994-95 Subscription Season (Irvine, California, 1994), pp. 10-11.

Paul R. Laird, "That Gut Feeling:  The World of Early Strings - The Shrine to Music Museum," Continuo 20, No. 3 (June 1996), p. 15.

Michael H. Hoffheimer, Fiddling for Viola (Pacific, Missouri: Mel Bay Publications, Inc., 2000), front cover.

Mary Oleskiewicz, "The Rise of Italian Chamber Music," Chapter Three in The World of Baroque Music:  New Perspectives, edited by George B. Stauffer (Bloomington: Indiana University Press, 2006), pp. 48-50.


NMM 9962.Viola by Frantz Straub, Friedenweiler, Germany, ca. 1685. Purchase funds gift of Tom and Cindy Lillibridge, Bonesteel, South Dakota, 2000.

Lit.:  John Koster, "Distinctive, Decorated 17th-Century Viola Acquired!" America's Shrine to Music Museum Newsletter 28, No. 1 (February 2001), pp. 1-2.


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VIOLINS
(in chronological order)

NMM 3366. Violin by Andrea Amati, Cremona, ca. 1560. Witten-Rawlins Collection, 1984. Consult the Luthier's Library for detailed measurements and photos.

Lit.:  Laurence C. Witten II, "The Surviving Instruments of Andrea Amati," Early Music 10, No. 4 (October 1982), pp. 489-491.

Andrea Mosconi and Laurence C. Witten, Capolavori di Andrea Amati (Cremona: Ente Triennale Internazionale degli Strumenti ad Arco, 1984), pp. 41-46 and 67.

Roger Hargrave, "Preservation Order," The Strad 96, No. 1142 (June 1985), p. 128.

Margaret Downie Banks, "The Witten-Rawlins Collection and Other Early Italian Stringed Instruments at The Shrine to Music Museum," Journal of the Violin Society of America 8, No. 3 (1987), pp. 30-31.

André P. Larson, The National Music Museum: A Pictorial Souvenir (Vermillion: National Music Museum, 1988), pp. 17 and 49.

"January 2009," The Strad Calendar 2009: The Museum Collection (London: The Strad, 2009).


NMM 5260. Violin by Andrea Amati, Cremona, 1574. Ex colls.: William Corbett, London; William Marshall; Hester S. Bowles; Richard Bennett, Lancashire; W. E. Hill & Sons, London. Rawlins Fund, 1991. Consult the Luthier's Library for detailed measurements and photos.

Lit.: Andrea Mosconi and Laurence C. Witten, Capolavori di Andrea Amati (Cremona: Ente Triennale Internazionale degli Strumenti ad Arco, 1984), pp. 17-22 and 63.

Daniel Draley, ed., A Genealogy of the Amati Family of Violin Makers 1500-1740: A Translation of 'La Genealogia degli Amati Liutai' by Carlo Bonetti, published in Cremona in 1938, Gertrud Graubart Champe, translator (DeWitt, Iowa: Daniel Draley, 1989), plates 7-10.

Important Musical Instruments, Phillips London Auction Catalog, November 21, 1991, Lot 180, pp. 68-69.

"1991 Acquisitions Include Rare Andrea Amati Violin," The Shrine to Music Museum Newsletter 19, No. 2 (January 1992), pp. 1-2.

"1991 Acquisitions at USD Music Museum," Newsletter of the American Musical Instrument Society 21, No. 1 (February 1992), p. 6.


NMM 14470. Violin, The King Henry IV, by Antonio and Girolamo Amati, Cremona, ca. 1595. Ex colls.: King Henry IV, France; François de Bassompierre and family, France; King Louis XVIII, France; Jean-Baptiste Cartier, Paris; George Hart, London; Royal de Forest Hawley, Hartford, Connecticut; Albert Hastings Pitkin, Hartford; Lyon & Healy, Chicago; Edmund V. Bukolt, Stevens Point, Wisconsin; The Copernicus Cultural Foundation, Chicago. Purchase funds gift of Kevin Schieffer, Sioux Falls, 2010.

Lit.:  "Amati Family Reunion Continues," Strings Trade: News and View of the Violin Business (June 2010).

Gary Ellenbolt, "A King's Violin: From Italy to South Dakota," All Things Considered, National Public Radio, July 7, 2010.

"National Music Museum Augments its Amati Collection: 'King Henry IV' Brothers Amati to Join Fine violins in Vermillion, South Dakota," The Strad website.

Sarah Deters Richardson and Jonathan Santa Maria Bouquet, "Medical Imaging Enables Staff to See the 'Whole' Picture," NMM Newsletter 37, No. 2 (August 2010).

Arian Sheets, "King Henry IV's Amati Violin Joins NMM's Crown Jewels," NMM Newsletter 37, No. 2 (August 2010).

Erin Shrader, "The French Connection—National Music Museum Receives the Rarest of Gifts," Strings 184 (August 2010): 68.

"The National Museum of Music [sic] Receives a Violin by Antonio and Girolamo Amati Bearing Armorials of King Henri IV of Navarre and France," France-Midwest Express Retrospective (August/September 2010).

"Violin Strings Together French Past and American Future," News from France: A Free Monthly Review of French News and Trends (Washington, DC: French Embassy Press and Communication Service) 10.07 (September 30, 2010): 8.

Andrew Dipper and Claire Givens, "Fit for A King," The Strad 121, No. 1446 (October 2010): 26-34. Link to Peter McGuire of the Minnesota Orchestra performing J. S. Bach's "Partita No. 3 in E Major" on The King Henry IV violin, on YouTube.

David Lias, "400-year-old Violin Unveiled at National Music Museum," Vermillion Plain Talk (October 1, 2010).

"Schieffer Unveils The King Henry IV Violin," National Music Museum Newsletter 37, No 3 (December 2010).


NMM 3420. Violin, northern Italy, ca. 1600. Ex coll.: Bisiach, Milan. Witten-Rawlins Collection, 1984.


NMM 3426. Violin, northern Italy, ca. 1600. Witten-Rawlins Collection, 1984.


NMM 3413. Violin, northern Italy, ca. 1600-30. Ex coll.: Harry Wahl, Viborg, Finland. Witten-Rawlins Collection, 1984.


NMM 3423. Violin by Girolamo Amati, Cremona, 1604. Ex coll.: E. M. W. Paul, London. Witten-Rawlins Collection, 1984. Consult the Luthier's Library for detailed measurements and photos.

Lit.:  Margaret Downie Banks, "The Witten-Rawlins Collection and Other Early Italian Stringed Instruments at The Shrine to Music Museum," Journal of the Violin Society of America 8, No. 3 (1987), pp. 32-33.


NMM 3364. Violin, 7/8-size, by Girolamo Amati, Cremona, 1609. Ex colls.: Pietro Verri, Milan; Melzi family; Bisiach, Milan. Witten-Rawlins Collection, 1984.

Lit.:  L'Esposizione di liuteria antica a Cremona nel 1937 (Cremona: Comitato Stradivariano, 1938), No. 5.

Margaret Downie Banks, "The Violino Piccolo and Other Small Violins," Early Music 18, No. 4 (November 1990), pp. 588-589.

Jeffrey S. Loen and A. Thomas King, "Thick and Thin," The Strad, Vol. 113, No. 1352 (December 2002), p. 1355.

André P. Larson, "Three Great Violins from the Witten-Rawlins Collection Will Go Home to Cremona, But Only for a Short Visit," National Music Museum Newsletter 33, No. 3 (August 2006), pp. 4-5.


NMM 3361.  Violino piccolo by Girolamo Amati, Cremona, 1613. Ex coll.: Andrew Fountaine, London. Witten-Rawlins Collection, 1984. Technical drawing available.

Lit.: "Purchase of Witten Collection Attracts Widespread Attention," Shrine to Music Museum, Inc. Newsletter 11, No. 4 (July 1984), p. 2.

"Witten Collection is Acquired by Shrine to Music Museum at USD," Newsletter of the American Musical Instrument Society 13, No. 3 (October 1984), pp. 1-3.

Roger Hargrave, "Preservation Order," The Strad 96, No. 1142 (June 1985), pp. 125 and 127.

Margaret Downie Banks, "The Witten-Rawlins Collection and Other Early Italian Stringed Instruments at The Shrine to Music Museum," Journal of the Violin Society of America 8, No. 3 (1987), pp. 33-35.

"Violino Piccolo to be Exhibited in Boston," The Shrine to Music Museum Newsletter 14, No. 3 (April 1987), p. 4.

Margaret Downie Banks, "Small is Beautiful:  A Violino Piccolo from the Age of Monteverdi," La Voce (July 1987), p. 4.

André P. Larson, The National Music Museum: A Pictorial Souvenir (Vermillion: National Music Museum, 1988), pp. 10 and 48.

Herbert W. Myers, "The Renaissance Violin: An Introduction for Players," Strings 4, No. 5 (March/April 1990), p. 34.

Margaret Downie Banks, "The Violino Piccolo and Other Small Violins," Early Music 18, No. 4 (November 1990), pp. 588-596.

Peter Walls, "Mozart and the Violin," Early Music 20, No. 1 (February 1992), p. 11.

Roger Hargrave, "The Failure of Brotherly Love?," The Strad 104, No. 1237 (May 1993), p. 471.

Paul R. Laird, "That Gut Feeling:  The World of Early Strings - The Shrine to Music Museum," Continuo 20, No. 3 (June 1996), pp. 14-15.

Robin Stowell, The Early Violin and Viola (Cambridge: Cambridge University Press, 2001), pp. 172-173.

André P. Larson, "Three Great Violins from the Witten-Rawlins Collection Will Go Home to Cremona, But Only for a Short Visit," National Music Museum Newsletter 33, No. 3 (August 2006), pp. 4-5.


NMM 3422. Violin by Lodovico Mariani, Pesaro, ca. 1620. Witten-Rawlins Collection, 1984.


NMM 3418. Violin, Brescian school, ca. 1625. Ex coll.: Bisiach, Milan. Witten-Rawlins Collection, 1984.


NMM 3356. Violin by Nicolo Amati, Cremona, 1628.  Ex colls.:  C. J. Read, Salisbury; Rev. James Moore; W. H. Symes; R. E. Brandt; E. A. Willmott; Richard Bennett; George Kemp; William MacNeil Rodewald, Jr., Paris and Palm Beach, Florida. Witten-Rawlins Collection, 1984. Consult the Luthier's Library for detailed measurements and photos.

Lit.:  An Illustrated Catalogue of the Music Loan Exhibition Held . . . by the Worshipful Company of Musicians of Fishmongers' Hall, June and July 1904 (London: Novello and Co., Ltd., 1909), p. 153.

"Witten Collection Acquired," Shrine to Music Museum, Inc., Newsletter 11, No. 3 (April 1984), p. 4.

Roger Hargrave, "Preservation Order," The Strad 96, No. 1142 (June 1985), pp. 125-127.

Margaret Downie Banks, "The Witten-Rawlins Collection and Other Early Italian Stringed Instruments at The Shrine to Music Museum," Journal of the Violin Society of America 8, No. 3 (1987), pp. 35-36.

André P. Larson, The National Music Museum: A Pictorial Souvenir (Vermillion: National Music Museum, 1988), pp. 17 and 49.

Margaret Downie Banks, "The Violino Piccolo and Other Small Violins," Early Music 18, No. 4 (November 1990), pp. 588-590.

Robin Stowell, The Early Violin and Viola (Cambridge: Cambridge University Press, 2001), p. 173.

André P. Larson, "Three Great Violins from the Witten-Rawlins Collection Will Go Home to Cremona, But Only for a Short Visit," National Music Museum Newsletter 33, No. 3 (August 2006), pp. 4-5.


NMM 3363. Violin, Brescian school, ca. 1630. Ex coll.: Bisiach, Milan. Witten-Rawlins Collection, 1984.


NMM 3424. Violin, northern Italy, ca. 1630. Witten-Rawlins Collection, 1984.


NMM 3365. Violin by Giovanni Paolo Maggini, Brescia, before 1632. Witten-Rawlins Collection, 1984.


NMM 4850. Violin labeled Matteo Bente, Brescia, before 1637. Arne B. Larson Estate, 1989.


NMM 3358. Violin, Brescian school, ca. 1640. Ex coll.: Bisiach, Milan. Witten-Rawlins Collection, 1984.


NMM 3414. Violin, northern Italy, ca. 1660. Later belly attributed to Antonio Stradivari. Ex coll.: E. M. W. Paul, London. Witten-Rawlins Collection, 1984.


NMM 4548. Violin by Jacob Stainer, Absam bei Innsbruck, 1668. Ex colls.: Fridolin Hamma, Stuttgart; W. E. Hill & Sons, London; Sam Bloomfield Foundation. Board of Trustees in memory of Arne B. and Jeanne F. Larson, 1989. Consult the Luthier's Library for detailed measurements and photos.

Lit.:  David D. Boyden, "Violin, §I, 4: c1600 to c1785," in The New Grove Dictionary of Music and Musicians, edited by Stanley Sadie (London: Macmillan, 1980), Vol. 19, p. 828, illustration 11a.

David D. Boyden, "Violin, §I, 4: c1600 to c1785," in The New Grove Dictionary of Musical Instruments, edited by Stanley Sadie (London: Macmillan, 1984), Vol. 3, p. 774, illustration 11a.


NMM 3598.  Violin, "The Harrison," by Antonio Stradivari, Cremona, 1693. Ex colls.: Harrison; Hottinger, New York. Rawlins Fund, 1985. Consult the Luthier's Library for detailed measurements and photos.

Lit.: W. Henry Hill, Arthur F. Hill, and Alfred E. Hill, Antonio Stradivari: His Life & Work (1644-1737), reprint of 1902 edition (New York: Dover Publications, 1963), between pp. 20-21 and 48.

Herbert Goodkind, Violin Iconography of Antonio Stradivari 1644-1937 (Larchmont, New York: Herbert Goodkind, 1972), pp. 243-244.

Simone F. Sacconi, The Secrets of Stradivari (Cremona : Libreria Del Convegno, 1979), pp. 26-27.

"Known as the 'Harrison' . . .  Famous 1693 Strad Acquired," Shrine to Music Museum, Inc. Newsletter 12, No. 3 (April 1985), pp. 1-2.

"USD Music Museum Buys 1693 'Harrison' Strad," Newsletter of the American Musical Instrument Society 14, No. 2 (June 1985), p. 11.

Roger Hargrave, "Preservation Order," The Strad 96, No. 1142 (June 1985), cover and p. 128.

Bein & Fushi, Inc., 1986 Calendar.

Charles Beare, Capolavori di Antonio Stradivari (Milan: Arnoldo Mondadori, 1987), pp. 56-57.

Margaret Downie Banks, "The Witten-Rawlins Collection and Other Early Italian Stringed Instruments at The Shrine to Music Museum," Journal of the Violin Society of America 8, No. 3 (1987), pp. 39-41.

André P. Larson, The National Music Museum: A Pictorial Souvenir (Vermillion: National Music Museum, 1988), opposite contents and pp. 6, 17 and 48.

Margaret Downie Banks, "The 'Harrison' Violin, the 'Rawlins' Guitar, and other Stradivari Materials at The Shrine to Music Museum," Journal of the Violin Society of America 9, No. 3 (1989), pp. 19-27.

André P. Larson, "The 'Harrison' Violin," The South Dakota Musician, 26, No. 3 (Spring 1992), front cover and p. 22.

Charles Beare, with the collaboration of Bruce Carlson, Antonio Stradivari: The Cremona Exhibition of 1987 (London: J. & A. Beare, 1993), pp. 108-113; 316-317.

The 2001 Strad Calendar, April 2001.

Jeffrey S. Loen and A. Thomas King, "Thick and Thin," The Strad 113, No. 1352 (December 2002), pp. 1354-1359.

André P. Larson, Beethoven & Berlioz, Paris & Vienna: Musical Treasures from the Age of Revolution & Romance 1789-1848, with essay by John Koster, exhibition catalog, Washington Pavilion, Sioux Falls, South Dakota, September 12-November 2, 2003 (Vermillion: National Music Museum 2003), cover and pp. 12, 26.


NMM 3353. Violin by Carlo Testore for Giovanni Grancino, Milan, 1693. Five strings. Ex coll.: Salzer, Vienna. Witten-Rawlins Collection, 1984.


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VIOLONCELLI
(in chronological order)

NMM 3351. Violoncello, The King, by Andrea Amati, Cremona, mid-16th century. Ex coll.: King Charles IX of France. Witten-Rawlins Collection, 1984. Technical drawing available (consult the Luthier's Library for additional measurements and photos).

Lit.:  William Sandys and Simon A. Forster, The History of the Violin (London: J. R. Smith, 1864), p. 203.

Carl Engel, Catalogue of the Special Exhibition of Ancient Musical Instruments (London: J. Strangeways, 1872), no. 183.

Olga Racster, Chats on Violoncellos (London: T. Werner Laurie, 1907), pp. 110-115.

An Illustrated Catalogue of the Music Loan Exhibition Held . . . by the Worshipful Company of Musicians of Fishmongers' Hall, June and July 1904 (London: Novello and Co., Ltd., 1909), p. 159.

Elizabeth Cowling, The Cello (New York: Charles Scribner's Sons, 1975), pp. 14 a-b; 28-29.

S. F. Sacconi, I segreti di Stradivari (Cremona: Libreria del Convegno, 1972; English translation, 1979), pp. 16-17.

Laurence C. Witten, "The Surviving Instruments of Andrea Amati," Early Music 10, No. 4 (October 1982), p. 491.

Andrea Mosconi and Laurence C. Witten, Capolavori di Andrea Amati (Cremona: Ente Triennale Internazionale degli Strumenti ad Arco, 1984), pp. 53-58 and 69.

"Witten Collection Acquired," Shrine to Music Museum, Inc., Newsletter 11, No. 3 (April 1984), p. 1.

Roger Hargrave, "Preservation Order," The Strad 96, No. 1142 (June 1985), p. 127.

Margaret Downie Banks, "The Witten-Rawlins Collection and Other Early Italian Stringed Instruments at The Shrine to Music Museum," Journal of the Violin Society of America 8, No. 3 (1987), pp. 27-31.

-------, "The 'King' Holds Court in Vermillion," La Voce of Claire Givens Violins, Inc. (February 1987), p. 5.

André P. Larson, The National Music Museum: A Pictorial Souvenir (Vermillion: National Music Museum, 1988), p. 49.

Daniel Draley, ed., A Genealogy of the Amati Family of Violin Makers 1500-1740: A Translation of 'La Genealogia degli Amati Liutai' by Carlo Bonetti, published in Cremona in 1938, Gertrud Graubart Champe, translator (DeWitt, Iowa: Daniel Draley, 1989), plate 5.

-------, "The Transition of the Amati Workshop into the Hands of Stradivari, 1660-1684," Journal of The Violin Society of America 9, No. 3 (1989), pp. 77 and 81.

Roger Hargrave, "Andrea Amati 1505-1577," The Strad 102, No. 1220 (December 1991), p. 1102.

André P. Larson, "Welcome to the Amati Society," America's Shrine to Music Museum Newsletter 25, No. 5 (November 1998), pp. 4-5.

Roger Hargrave, "Artistic Alliance," The Strad 111, No. 1324 (August 2000), pp. 832-837.

André P. Larson, Beethoven & Berlioz, Paris & Vienna: Musical Treasures from the Age of Revolution & Romance 1789-1848, with essay by John Koster, exhibition catalog, Washington Pavilion, Sioux Falls, South Dakota, September 12-November 2, 2003 (Vermillion: National Music Museum 2003), p. 28.

Paul Laird, The Baroque Cello Revival: An Oral History (Lanham, Maryland: Scarecrow Press, 2004), unnumbered page between pp. 176-177.

Joshua Koestenbaum, Demonstration of The King on The Secrets, Lives, and Violins of the Great Cremona Makers 1505-1744 (Minneapolis: Claire Givens Violins, Inc., 2005). CD.

Renato Meucci, editor, Un corpo alla ricerca dell'anima . . . Andrea Amati and the Birth of the Violin 1505-2005, Exhibition Catalog, Vol. 1 (Cremona: Ente Triennale Internazionale degli Strumenti ad Arco Consorzio Liutai Antonio Stradivari Cremona, 2005), pp. 171-181.

Mary Oleskiewicz, "The Rise of Italian Chamber Music," Chapter Three in The World of Baroque Music:  New Perspectives, edited by George B. Stauffer (Bloomington: Indiana University Press, 2006), pp. 48, 50, and plate 8.

Andrew Dipper, "The King Cello and the Painted Decorations on the Amati Instruments Made for the Court of Charles IX of France, 1560-1574," Journal of the Violin Society of America, Vol. 20, No. 2 (Summer 2006), pp. 15-78.


NMM 3378. Violoncello (originally a bass viola da gamba by Gasparo da Salo, Brescia, before 1609). Converted to a violoncello, probably in the 19th century. Ex coll.: Beare, London. Witten-Rawlins Collection, 1984.


NMM 3372. Violoncello, Brescian school, ca. 1625. Ex coll.: Robert Haven Schauffler, New York. Witten-Rawlins Collection, 1984.


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